Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘twitter’

Does Twittering in the Classroom Increase Student Engagement?

Bridget K. Welch, Jess Bonnan-White (2012) Twittering to increase student engagement in the university classroom, Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal, Vol.4, No.3.

We found that in the experimental condition, there was a significant affect of Twitter enjoyment on student engagement with those saying they enjoyed Twitter being significantly more engaged than those who did not enjoy Twitter. This was the case across four large lecture courses across two disciplines (Anthropology and Sociology). Following the work of Krause and Coates (2008), engagement consisted of four dimensions: academic, intellectual, peer, and beyond-class. We discuss our problematic findings in terms of engagement in general and academic engagement in particular. We then discuss our enjoyment findings and provide student comments that help contextualize these results.  

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What factors influence professionals in their use of Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn?

Alexander Sjöberg (2012) Making Sense of a Technology, A study of how professionals use, understand and create a sense of Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter and what factor’s that might influence these processes, University of Gothenburg

The social media technology has during the last years been increasingly introduced into many professionals’ practices, which might place new demands on how individuals and organizations use, perceive, understand and structure this technology in relation to their professional practices. This paper aims to contribute to a deeper understanding of aspects that might influence professionals in their use of, capability to adapt to and ability to create a sense of Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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How can Online Technologies Engage Learning?

Lee Revere, Jamison V. Kovach (2011) Online Technologies for Engaged Learning, A Meaningful Synthesis for Educators, The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, Volume 12(2), 2011, pp. 113–124

Online education is well established in academia; however, the effectiveness of course design and student engagement remains uncertain. To deliver the highest quality online education, students should be engaged in learning exercises. Appropriately integrated technology can be used to foster student engagement, build a learner-centered environment, and make course content come alive. This article synthesizes information about well-established and relatively new technologies, such as discussion boards, chat sessions, blogs, Twitter, Skype, YouTube, and so on, to provide guidance for educators interested in integrating these tools within their online learning environment. Instructors who effectively incorporate technology as learning tools in their online courses can expect to achieve enhanced student engagement as well as higher levels of learning and more efficient classroom management.

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How can influence be measured on Twitter and other Social Media?

Daniel M. Romero, Wojciech Galuba, Sitaram Asur, Bernardo A. Huberman (2010) Influence and Passivity in Social Media, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2011, Volume 6913/2011, 18-33

The ever-increasing amount of information flowing through Social Media forces the members of these networks to compete for attention and influence by relying on other people to spread their message. A large study of information propagation within Twitter reveals that the majority of users act as passive information consumers and do not forward the content to the network. Therefore, in order for individuals to become influential they must not only obtain attention and thus be popular, but also overcome user passivity. We propose an algorithm that determines the influence and passivity of users based on their information forwarding activity. An evaluation performed with a 2.5 million user dataset shows that our influence measure is a good predictor of URL clicks, outperforming several other measures that do not explicitly take user passivity into account. We also explicitly demonstrate that high popularity does not necessarily imply high influence and vice-versa.

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Is Twitter Effective for Language Learning?

Kerstin Borau, Carsten Ullrich, Jinjin Feng, and Ruimin Shen (2009) Microblogging for Language Learning: Using Twitter to Train Communicative and Cultural Competence,  Advances in Web Based Learning – ICWL 2009 (2009) Volume: 5686, Issue: 500

Our work analyzes the usefulness of microblogging in second language learning using the example of the social network Twitter. Most learners of English do not require even more passive input in form of texts, lectures or videos, etc. This input is readily available in numerous forms on the Internet. What learners of English need is the chance to actively produce language and the chance to use English as tool of communication. This calls for instructional methods and tools promoting ‘active’ learning that present opportunities for students to express themselves and interact in the target language. In this paper we describe how we used Twitter with students of English at the Distant College of Shanghai Jiao Tong University. We analyze the students’ messages and show how the usage of Twitter trained communicative and cultural competence.

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What does a flexible multi-layered approach to information literacy look like?

Sophie McDonald, Jemima McDonald (2011) Information Literacy For Ubiquitous Learning,  in Information Online 2011 ALIA 15th Conference and Exhibition, 1-3 Feb 2011 

The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) Library is developing a new approach to delivering information literacy (IL). This paper will discuss the 2010 UTS Library Fun Day and the strategic use of informal information literacy activities such as games, trivia and treasure hunts incorporating the use of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. These give new and ‘old’ clients an opportunity to explore the Library and get involved with our dynamic new learning environment. The paper will also provide insight into how we are supporting researchers across the research life cycle, embedding ourselves in faculties and using Web 2.0 technologies in training to equip twenty first-century researchers with effective IL skills.

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Why should Librarians be on Twitter?

Forrestal, Valerie(2011) ‘Making Twitter Work: A Guide for the Uninitiated, the Skeptical, and the Pragmatic’, The Reference Librarian, 52: 1, 146 — 151

This article highlights the advantages of librarians and libraries establishing a professional or institutional presence on Twitter. This basic introduction to the web service also discusses innovative ways to shape your Twitter account into a successful professional development, reference, and outreach resource.

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What is the effect of Twitter on student engagement and grades?

R. Junco, G. Heiberger, E. Loken (2011) The effect of Twitter on college student engagement and grades, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, Volume: 27, Issue: 2, Pages: 119-132

Despite the widespread use of social media by students and its increased use by instructors, very little empirical evidence is available concerning the impact of social media use on student learning and engagement. This paper describes our semester-long experimental study to determine if using Twitter the microblogging and social networking platform most amenable to ongoing, public dialogue for educationally relevant purposes can impact college student engagement and grades. The results showed that the experimental group had a significantly greater increase in engagement than the control group, as well as higher semester grade point averages. Analyses of Twitter communications showed that students and faculty were both highly engaged in the learning process in ways that transcended traditional classroom activities. This study provides experimental evidence that Twitter can be used as an educational tool to help engage students and to mobilize faculty into a more active and participatory role.

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