Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘reading and writing with technology’

Do e-readers make any difference to comprehension?

Wright, S., Fugett, A., & Caputa, F. (2013). Using E-readers and Internet Resources to Support Comprehension. Educational Technology & Society, 16 (1), 367–379.

The advancements of technology have led to the use of electronic reading systems for digital text. Research indicates similarities and differences in reading performance and comprehension in digital formats compared to paper formats. This study compared vocabulary understanding and reading comprehension scores from two reading sources (electronic story book and paper-based book). This study also evaluated the use of reading resources available (dictionary, thesaurus, word pronunciation) between the two reading methods.  The results of this study conclude that although vocabulary and reading comprehension is consistent between the two reading methods, students are more likely to utilize reading resources when engaged with digital text. This article supports that comprehension of written materials remains unchanged for students regardless of presentation method (print versus digital).

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How Effective is Education Technology in Enhancing Reading Achievement?

Alan C. K. Cheung,  Robert E. Slavin (2011) The Effectiveness of Education Technology for Enhancing Reading Achievement: A Meta-Analysis, The Best Evidence Encyclopedia,  Johns Hopkins University School of Education’s Center for Data-Driven Reform in Education (CDDRE)

The present review examines research on the effects of technology use on reading achievement in K-12 classrooms. Unlike previous reviews, this review applies consistent inclusion standards to focus on studies that met high methodological standards. In addition, methodological and substantive features of the studies are investigated to examine the relationship between education technology and study features. A total of 85 qualified studies based on over 60,000 K-12 participants were included in the final analysis. Consistent with previous reviews of similar focus, the findings suggest that education technology generally produced a positive, though small, effect (ES=+0.16) in comparison to traditional methods. However, the effects may vary by education technology type. In particular, the types of supplementary computer-assisted instruction programs that have dominated the classroom use of education technology in the past few decades are not producing educationally meaningful effects in reading for K-12 students. In contrast, innovative technology applications and integrated literacy interventions with the support of extensive professional development showed somewhat promising evidence. However, too few randomized studies for these promising approaches are available at this point for firm conclusions.

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How can the beliefs of teachers impact the way computer technology enhances learning of reading and writing for preschool students?

Ihmeideh, Fathi (2010) The role of computer technology in teaching reading and writing: preschool teachers’ beliefs and practices,  Journal of Research in Childhood Education, Jan-March, 2010 Source Volume: 24 Source Issue: 1

This study investigated preschool teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding the use of computer technology in teaching reading and writing in Jordan. The researcher developed a questionnaire consisting of two scales–Teachers’ Beliefs Scale (TB Scale) and Teachers’ Practices Scale (TP Scale)–to examine the role of computer technology in teaching reading and writing to preschoolers. A random sample of 154 preschool teachers participated in the study by completing the questionnaire; 12 teachers were later interviewed. Results indicated that the preschool teachers’ beliefs about the use of computer technology were aligned with their perceptions of their teaching practices, although teachers’ beliefs and their perceptions of their practices were fairly moderate. The results also revealed significant differences between kindergartens in favor of public kindergartens, and the training programs in favor of trained teachers, whereas there was no difference due to area of certification. Directions for further research and recommendations for policy and practice are discussed.

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