Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘online safety’

How and Why Do Teenagers Use Video Chat?

Tatiana Buhler, Carman Neustaedter, and Serena Hillman (2013) How and Why Teenagers Use Video Chat, Proceedings of the Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, ACM Press

Teenagers are increasingly using video chat systems to communicate with others, however, little research has been conducted to explore how and why they use the technology. To better understand this design space, we present the results of a study of twenty teenagers and their use of video chat systems such as Skype, FaceTime, and Google Hangouts. Our results show that video chat plays an important role in helping teenagers socialize with their friends after school and on weekends where it allows them to see emotional reactions and participate in activities like shared homework sessions, show and tell, and performances over distance.

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What are the Security and Privacy Concerns raised by BYOD?

Keith W. Miller, Jeffrey Voas, George F. Hurlburt (2012) BYOD: Security and Privacy Considerations, Published by the IEEE Computer Society

Clearly, there are several important advantages for employees and employers when employees bring their own devices to work. But there are also significant concerns about security (where the employers have more to lose) and privacy (where the employees have more to lose). Companies and individuals involved—or thinking about getting involved—with BYOD should think carefully about the risks as well as the rewards. At the same time, there must be realization that the next generations of “digital natives” will likely have strong BYOT expectations.

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How do players manage moral concerns to make video game violence enjoyable?

Christoph Klimmt, Hannah Schmid, Andreas Nosper, Tilo Hartmann, Peter Vorderer (2006) How players manage moral concerns to make video game violence enjoyable, Communications Volume: 31, Issue: 3, Publisher: De Gruyter, Pages: 309-328

Research on video game violence has focused on the impact of aggression, but has so far neglected the processes and mechanisms underlying the enjoyment of video game violence. The present contribution examines a specific process in this context, namely players strategies to cope with moral concern that would (in real-life settings) arise from violent actions. Based on Banduras (2002) theory of moral disengagement, we argue that in order to maintain their enjoyment of game violence, players find effective strategies to avoid or cope with the moral conflict related to their violent behaviors in the game world (moral management). Exploratory interviews with ten players of violent video games revealed some relevance of moral reasoning to their game enjoyment, and several strategies that help players to manage moral concern. Most importantly, respondents referred to the game-reality distinction and their focus on winning the game when explaining how violent action is a by-product of good performance. Findings are discussed in light of further theorizing on moral management and potential links to the media violence debate.

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What are the legal risks facing young people using network sites?

David Lindsay, Melissa de Zwart, Michael Henderson, Michael Phillips (2011) Understanding legal risks facing children and young people using social network sites, Telecommunications Journal of Australia, Vol.61, No1 (2011)

Children and young people are increasingly participating in everyday use of Social Networking Sites (SNS), such as Facebook or MySpace, to the extent that such interactions have come to be seen as an essential part of growing up. To date, mainstream discussion and policy debates about young people and SNS have tended to focus on high profile risks associated with these activities, such as cyber-bullying and online grooming of children by adults. While not dismissing the potential risks of SNS use by young people, it is important to understand the potential benefits that may accrue from online social interactions, including the acquisition of social and technical skills that are likely to be important for future digital citizens. Moreover, it is also important not to ignore other potential, albeit less dramatic, risks that may arise from SNS use. This article focuses on the range of legal risks that children and young people may face in their everyday use of SNS.  The article concludes with an analysis of the research findings, and some suggestions as to how the popularity of SNS with young people may be used to engage students in learning about, and debating, the application of the law to online activities, especially the use of SNS.

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How are students and teachers using Facebook?

Khe Foon Hew (2011) Students’ and teachers’ use of Facebook, Computers in Human Behavior 27 (2011) 662–676

The purpose of this article is to review current published research studies focusing on the use of Facebook by students and teachers. The aim of the review is not to solely discuss Facebook in relation to teaching or learning purposes, or about its educational value per se, but also to present a detailed account of the participants’ Facebook usage profile or the extent to which users are engaged in Facebook activities. The emphasis of this review will be upon empirical findings rather than opinion- or theoretical explanations. The conclusions overall suggest that Facebook thus far has very little educational use, that students use Facebook mainly to keep in touch with known individuals, and that students tend to disclose more personal information about themselves on Facebook.

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What does research say about how young people experience privacy online?

Alice E. Marwick, Diego Murgia Diaz, John Palfrey (2010) Youth, Privacy, and Reputation, Harvard Law School Public Law & Legal Theory Working Paper Series Paper No. 10-29

Much popular writing (and some research) includes descriptions of young people, online technologies, and privacy in ways that do not reflect the realities of most children and teenagers’ lives. Our review of the literature suggests that young people care deeply about privacy, particularly with regard to parents and teachers viewing personal information. Young people are heavily monitored at home, at school, and in public by a variety of surveillance technologies. Children and teenagers want private spaces for socialization, exploration, and experimentation, away from adult eyes. Posting personal information online is a way for youth to express themselves, connect with peers, increase popularity, and bond with friends and members of peer groups. Subsequently, young people want to be able to restrict information provided online in a nuanced and granular way.

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How can Social Networks be used in schools to enable teens to become responsible digital citizens?

Jayme Waddington (2011) Social Networking: The Unharnessed Educational Tool, Undergraduate Research Journal at UCCS Volume 4.1, May 2011

How can teenagers of today become model digital citizens of tomorrow? In order to ensure that students are modeling safe and healthy online behaviors they must be taught what those behaviors are. Teachers, along with parents, are charged with educating youth and providing them with the skills that are necessary to prosper in the world. Society cannot expect teens to know what to do online and act appropriately without guidance; just as we teach our children what is right and wrong in the “real” world, the same needs to be done in the “virtual” world. While instructing students on how to keep their profiles secure and warning them of the dangers on the internet, educators are providing the first step towards successful digital citizenship. Schools have the opportunity to not only educate and teach students safe digital media usage but also incorporate digital media into everyday classroom experiences.

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How much privacy are we willing to relinquish when we trust online?

Adam N. Joinson, Ulf-Dietrich Reips, Tom Buchanan, Carina B. Paine Schofield (2008) Privacy, Trust and Self-Disclosure, in press, human-computer interaction

Despite increased concern about the privacy threat posed by new technology and the Internet, there is relatively little evidence that people’s privacy concerns translate to privacy-enhancing behaviors while online. In Study 1, measures of privacy concern are collected, followed six weeks later by a request for intrusive personal information alongside measures of trust in the requestor and perceived privacy related to the specific request (n= 759). Participants’ dispositional privacy concerns, as well as their level of trust in the requestor and perceived privacy during the interaction, predicted whether or not they acceded to the request for personal information, although the impact of perceived privacy was mediated by trust. In Study 2, privacy and trust were experimentally manipulated, and disclosure measured (n=180). The results indicated that privacy and trust at a situational level interact such that high trust compensates for low privacy, and vice versa. Implications for understanding the links between privacy attitudes, trust, design and actual behavior, are discussed.

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How Risky Are Social Networking Sites?

Michele L Ybarra, Kimberly J Mitchell (2008) How Risky Are Social Networking Sites? A Comparison of Places Online Where Youth Sexual Solicitation and Harassment Occurs, Pediatrics (2008) Volume: 121, Issue: 2, Pages: 2007–357

OBJECTIVE. Recently, public attention has focused on the possibility that social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook are being widely used to sexually solicit underage youth, consequently increasing their vulnerability to sexual victimization. Beyond anecdotal accounts, however, whether victimization is more commonly reported in social networking sites is unknown. RESULTS. Fifteen percent of all of the youth reported an unwanted sexual solicitation online in the last year; 4% reported an incident on a social networking site specifically. Thirty-three percent reported an online harassment in the last year; 9% reported an incident on a social networking site specifically. Among targeted youth, solicitations were more commonly reported via instant messaging (43%) and in chat rooms (32%), and harassment was more commonly reported in instant messaging (55%) than through social networking sites (27% and 28%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. Broad claims of victimization risk, at least defined as unwanted sexual solicitation or harassment, associated with social networking sites do not seem justified. Prevention efforts may have a greater impact if they focus on the psychosocial problems of youth instead of a specific Internet application, including funding for online youth outreach programs, school antibullying programs, and online mental health services.

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How exposed are youth to unwanted material on the internet?

Kimberly J Mitchell, David Finkelhor, Janis Wolak (2003) The Exposure Of Youth To Unwanted Sexual Material On The Internet: A National Survey of Risk, Impact, and Prevention, Youth Society (2003) Volume: 34, Issue: 3, Publisher: Sage Publications, Pages: 330-358

This national survey of youth ages 10 to 17 yrs, and their caretakers has several implications for the current debate about young people and Internet pornography. Using an Internet survey, the authors found that 25% of youth had unwanted exposure to sexual pictures on the Internet in the past year, challenging the prevalent assumption that the problem is primarily about young people motivated seek out pornography. Most youth had no negative reactions to their unwanted exposure, but one quarter said they were very of extremely upset suggesting a priority need for more research on and interventions directed toward such negative effects. The use of filtering and blocking software was associated with a modest reduction in unwanted exposure suggesting that it may help but is far from foolproof. Various forms of parental supervision were not associated with any reduction in exposure.

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How can schools manage the dangers of websites for young children?

Bauman, Sheri, Tatum, Tanisha, (2009) Web Sites for Young Children: Gateway to Online Social Networking? Professional School Counseling, 10962409, 20091001, Vol. 13, Issue 1

Traffic on Web sites for young children (ages 3-12) has increased exponentially in recent years. Advocates proclaim that they are safe introductions to the Internet and online social networking and teach essential 21st-century skills. Critics note developmental concerns. This article provides basic information about Web sites for young children, discuss developmental issues, and make recommendations for school counselors to be proactive and aware of the advantages and dangers inherent in these sites.

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