Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘mobile technology’

How are Mobile Technologies supporting the Teaching of Literacy in Western Australia?

Grace Oakley, Mark Pegrum, Robert Faulkner & Michelle Striepe (2012) Exploring the Pedagogical Applications of Mobile Technologies for Teaching Literacy, Report for the Association of Independent Schools of Western Australia

Using a multiple case study strategy, this project set out to explore how independent schools in Western Australia were using mobile technologies such as iPads and iPod Touches to support, enhance and transform teaching and learning in the English learning area as well as, more broadly, the area of literacy as a ‘general capability’ across the curriculum.

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iPad: A New Classroom Technology?

Alma L. Culén, Andrea Gasparini (2012) iPad: A New Classroom Technology? A Report From Two Pilot Studies, INFuture2011: “Information Sciences and e-Society”

In this paper we discuss two pilot studies involving the use of iPads for active reading in a teaching/learning situation. This is part of a broader study of how introducing tablet PCs may transform the work and learning practices of learners. One of the pilot studies was conducted in a graduate level course, involving 40 university students. The other study involved 26 fourth grade elementary schoolchildren. The results concerning acceptance of the technology were vastly different in the two studies. We find the comparison to be very interesting in several aspects, most notably on the issue of ownership and perceived useful- ness. We hope that our experience with these pilot studies may be of use and interest for a wider community. Our research method is based on ethnography (in-class observations), enriched by workshops, questionnaires, group and individual interviews involving students, faculty and, in the case of elementary schoolchildren, families. The data from interviews has been consolidated and mapped out into an affinity diagram. The resulting diagram shows clearly issues that should be further addressed, as well as areas where changes in study- related work practices may occur. This paper offers some reflections on differences and similarities observed in the two study situations.

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Does Digitalk build a Community?

Kristen Hawley Turner (2012) Digitalk as Community, English Journal 101.4 (2012): 37–42

With the increasing popularity among today’s teens of email, texting, and instant messaging, a recognizable change has occurred in the language that students use in their writing. “Audience, Purpose, and Language Use in Electronic Messages” explores the language of electronic messages and how it affects other writing. Further, it explores the freedom and creativity for using Internet abbreviations for specific purposes and examines the impor- tance of a more formal style of writing based on audience.

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What factors need to be considered when Developing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Strategy in Higher Education?

Scott Emery (2012) Factors for Consideration when Developing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Strategy in Higher Education, Applied Information Management and the Graduate School of the University of Oregon in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science

The consumerization of IT changes the ways in which IT departments must plan for and manage technology. This annotated bibliography presents factors for consideration by IT leaders in higher education when developing an institution-wide strategy to address the use of personally owned mobile handheld devices, known as bring your own device (BYOD). Literature published between 2007 and 2012 is examined in regards to four categories: (a) policy creation, (b) data security, (c) user education, and (d) mobile learning.

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What is the relationship between multitasking and academic performance?

Reynol Junco, Shelia R. Cotten (2011) The relationship between multitasking and academic performance, Computers & Education 59 (2012) 505–514

The proliferation and ease of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as Facebook, text messaging, and instant messaging has resulted in ICT users being presented with more real-time streaming data than ever before. Unfortunately, this has also resulted in individuals increasingly engaging in multitasking as an information management strategy. The purpose of this study was to examine how college students multitask with ICTs and to determine the impacts of this multitasking on their college grade point average (GPA). Using web survey data from a large sample of college students at one university (N 1⁄4 1839), we found that students reported spending a large amount of time using ICTs on a daily basis. Students reported frequently searching for content not related to courses, using Face- book, emailing, talking on their cell phones, and texting while doing schoolwork. Hierarchical (blocked) linear regression analyses revealed that using Facebook and texting while doing schoolwork were negatively associated with overall college GPA. Engaging in Facebook use or texting while trying to complete schoolwork may tax students’ capacity for cognitive processing and preclude deeper learning. Our research indicates that the type and purpose of ICT use matters in terms of the educational impacts of multitasking.

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How can iPods Facilitate Vocabulary Instruction with ESL Students?

Lucretia M. Fraga, Janis M. Harmon, Karen D. Wood, and Elizabeth Buckelew-Martin (2011) “Digital Word Walls and Vocabulary Learning: The Use of iPods to Facilitate Vocabulary Instruction with ESL Students”, Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology (RCET) Vol. 7, No. 2, Fall 2011

Mobile devices such as iPods can be potentially effective learning tools, especially for advancing the vocabulary development of English as a Second Language (ESL) learners. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to investigate ESL high school students’ knowledge of using iPods for learning vocabulary; and (2) to determine ESL high school students’ achievement differences in vocabulary when exposed to two traditional vocabulary instructional frameworks using word walls versus digital word wall instruction. The study followed a mixed-method design using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The specific strategies used to support vocabulary learning in all three instructional frameworks were based upon the principles of effective vocabulary instruction and factors related to active student engagement. Findings indicate no statistically significant differences between instructional frameworks in word-meaning acquisition. However, students were more engaged in the activities associated with the digital word wall framework, i.e. activities related to developing vocabulary vodcasts.

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How is Information Literacy Integrated in Laptop Classrooms?

Mark Warschauer (2007) Information Literacy in the Laptop Classroom, Teachers College Record

Technological and economic changes have put a high premium on developing students information literacy and research skills. Previous attempts to deploy educational technology toward these ends have proved disappointing because K12 teachers have difficulty integrating shared computers into instruction. In response, numerous schools and districts have piloted one-to-one programs, in which each student has access to a laptop computer connected wirelessly to the Internet throughout the school day. Purpose/Objective: This paper analyzes the information literacy and research practice in a purposely stratified selection of 10 one-to-one laptop K12 schools in California and Maine. Research Design/Data Collection and Analysis: Sources of data in this multisite case study include observations, interviews, surveys, and teacher- and student-produced materials. Findings/Results: The study found that students in all the laptop schools learned to access information, manage it, and incorporate in into their written and multimedia products. However, the focus on evaluating information, understanding the social issues surround- ing it, and analyzing it for the purpose of knowledge production varied widely across schools. Some schools succeeded in promoting scholarly approaches to working with informa- tion, whereas other schools mostly limited themselves to teaching procedural functions of computer and Internet use. Examples of these differences are given through a comparison of three diverse schools in Maine. Conclusions/Recommendations: The study concludes that one-to-one wireless laptops offer important affordances for promoting information literacy and research skills but that socioe- conomic context, visions, values, and beliefs all play a critical role in shaping how laptop programs are implemented and what benefits are thus achieved.

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What is the potential of m-learning?

Rosman, P. (2008). M-learning – A paradigm of new forms in education. E M Ekonomie a Management11(1), 119-125.

Mobile technologies are a future in e-learning technologies. The paper presents the details of using mobile devices and wireless technologies that could be used for m-learning in education and training. Mobile devices can have more processing power, slicker displays, and more interesting applications than were commonly available on desktop machines ten years ago, and educators are quickly realizing their potential to be used as powerful learning tools. However, the application of mobile technologies to learning contexts must take into account a number of factors. Above all other things, we must consider how mobile learning can be used to provide learners with better opportunities and enhanced learning outcomes. This paper is concerned about the problems of using mobile devices and wireless technologies, a differentiation between teaming and technology as the driver for mobile learning approaches and than the classification of mobile learning activities. M-learning is the exciting art of using mobile technologies to enhance the learning experience. Mobile phones, PDAs, Pocket PCs and the Internet can be blended to engage and motivate learners, any time and anywhere. Handheld devices are emerging as one of the most promising technologies for supporting learning and particularly collaborative learning scenarios; mainly because they offer new opportunities for individuals who require mobile computer solutions that other devices cannot provide. The highly personalized nature of digital mobile devices provides an excellent platform for the development of personalized, learner-centric educational experiences. In paper is emphasized the importance of considering learning over technology, and suggest a pedagogically based framework for developing learner-centric m-learning. The evolution in education and training at a distance can be characterized as a move from distance learning to e-learning and m-learning (mobile learning).

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With more an more ipads and laptops in the classrooms how can schools introduce best ergonomic practices?

Studies indicate that musculoskeletal discomfort and back pain problems are evident not only in adults, but also in children [11,13]. We believe that educating towards a balanced-posture, body-function and movement patterns, as well as their ergonomic implications, can minimize and even prevent these problems. Such an ergonomics awareness educational program has to start at childhood and should be an integral part of the curriculum in the schools. This article presents the educational program “Ergonomics, Movement & Posture” (EMP), which is taught in elementary schools by Physical Education (PE) students of the Kibbutzim College of Education in Israel, as part of their practicum. Although there has been no formal evaluation of the effectiveness of the program, so far, participating children, their parents, the teachers and the principles have offered positive feedback.

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