Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘mobile devices’

What can we learn from the adoption of iPads in Western Australian independent schools?

Mark Pegrum, Grace Oakley and Robert Faulkner (2013) Schools going mobile: A study of the adoption of mobile handheld technologies in Western Australian independent schools, Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 2013, 29(1).

This paper reports on the adoption of mobile handheld technologies in ten Western Australian independent schools, based on interviews with staff conducted in 2011. iPads were the most popular device, followed by iPod Touches and iPhones. Class sets were common at lower levels, with 1:1 models becoming increasingly common at higher levels. Mobile learning, or m-learning, was still at an experimental stage in most schools, but common themes were already emerging around the need to integrate mobile devices into a broader learning ecology. Key discussions focused on their role in promoting consumption or production, collaboration or personalisation, and creating seamless learning spaces. Used for both organisational and pedagogical purposes, mobile devices were seen as enhancing student motivation, with empirical evidence of improved student learning also emerging in small-scale studies conducted by two schools. Challenges included the need to carefully manage the technology, ethical issues in its use, and staff roles in its deployment. Pedagogically grounded and adequately contextualised professional development (PD) was seen as vital for time-poor staff, while a desire to set up a professional community of practice was widely expressed. All the schools surveyed planned to extend their use of mobile handheld technologies in the future.

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New Media Use in Brazil: Digital Inclusion or Digital Divide?

Sueila Pedrozo, University of Turku, Finland (2013) New Media Use in Brazil: Digital Inclusion or Digital Divide?, Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies, Volume: 3 – Issue: 1 – January – 2013

The emergence of ICTs brought economic growth and development for many countries, but brought the digital divide as well. In Brazil, there was a democratization effect with the adoption of mobile phones reaching all social classes but the internet still lags behind. No doubt there is a correlation between digital exclusion and other forms of inequalities – social, economic, educational, and demographic. Technology access is just the first step to digital inclusion but digital literacy is even more important and has to follow it; the full inclusion for all depend not only on public policies but mainly on quality education and teachers’ training, to enable underprivileged youth to learn and use ICT resources and potential.

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How can self-regulated learning (SRL) foster student-centred lifelong mobile learning?

L. Sha,  C.-K. Looi, W. Chen, & B.H. Zhang (2012) Understanding mobile learning from the perspective of self-regulated learning, Institute of Education, Nanjing University

This paper is an initial effort to expand and enrich the knowledge about mobile learning within the framework of self-regulated learning. One of the largest challenges will be how self-regulated learning (SRL) can be systematically and institutionally applied to curriculum development, instructional design, teacher professional development, and teaching and assessment practices in classrooms that foster student-centred lifelong learning. We propose an analytic SRL model of mobile learning as a conceptual framework for understanding mobile learning, in which the notion of self-regulation as agency is at the core. We draw on work in a 3-year research project in developing and implementing a mobile learning environment in elementary science classes in Singapore to illustrate the application of SRL theories and methodology to understand and analyse mobile learning.

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iPad: A New Classroom Technology?

Alma L. Culén, Andrea Gasparini (2012) iPad: A New Classroom Technology? A Report From Two Pilot Studies, INFuture2011: “Information Sciences and e-Society”

In this paper we discuss two pilot studies involving the use of iPads for active reading in a teaching/learning situation. This is part of a broader study of how introducing tablet PCs may transform the work and learning practices of learners. One of the pilot studies was conducted in a graduate level course, involving 40 university students. The other study involved 26 fourth grade elementary schoolchildren. The results concerning acceptance of the technology were vastly different in the two studies. We find the comparison to be very interesting in several aspects, most notably on the issue of ownership and perceived useful- ness. We hope that our experience with these pilot studies may be of use and interest for a wider community. Our research method is based on ethnography (in-class observations), enriched by workshops, questionnaires, group and individual interviews involving students, faculty and, in the case of elementary schoolchildren, families. The data from interviews has been consolidated and mapped out into an affinity diagram. The resulting diagram shows clearly issues that should be further addressed, as well as areas where changes in study- related work practices may occur. This paper offers some reflections on differences and similarities observed in the two study situations.

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What tools do teens use to communicate?

Amanda Lenhart (2012) Teens, Smartphones & Texting, Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project

Teens are fervent communicators. Straddling childhood and adulthood, they communicate frequently with a variety of important people in their lives: friends and peers, parents, teachers, coaches, bosses, and a myriad of other adults and institutions. This report examines the tools teens use to communicate, with a particular focus on mobile devices, and then places the use of those tools in the broader context of how teens choose to communicate with people in their lives.

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Does the use of Place Affect Learner Engagement? The Case of GeoStoryteller on the Streets of New York

Drs. Anthony Cocciolo and Debbie Rabina (2012) Does the use of Place Affect Learner Engagement? The Case of GeoStoryteller on the Streets of New York, Proceedings of the 2012 iConference

The aim of this research project is to uncover if place-based learning can increase learner engagement and understanding of historical topics. To study this, learners will use GeoStoryteller to learn about a historical topic on the places where those events occurred, and then be interviewed by the researchers. GeoStoryteller is a tool developed by the researchers that runs on smart phones such as Apple’s iPhone. It provides the user multimedia stories about the historical sites, delivered via the mobile web or through Layar, an augmented reality web browser. Place provides the learner with a meaningful entry point to the topic and one that increases the topic’s prominence within an information environment that is seemingly limitless. This environment—for those who have broadband connections to the Internet—is constantly growing in interesting facts and resources yet proves difficult for the user in determining what is worth knowing, creating what individuals often describe as information overload (e.g., Shirky, 2008). Whereas the Internet is seemingly unbounded, geographic space has the advantage of being finite and inherently understood. Providing users with meaningful entry points to information, such as through the use of already familiar places, is hypothesized to increase engagement and subsequent understanding.

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How information literate are students in the mobile environment?

Yarmey, K. (2011) Student information literacy in the mobile environment, Educause Quarterly Magazine, 34(1).

The results of the Scranton Smartphone Survey indicate that, while students are interested in using their phones for academic purposes, they still require guidance from educators to choose the most appropriate mobile resource and to evaluate mobile websites and mobile apps. As Agnes Kukulska-Hulme noted, “Learners tend to move between using desktop computers and mobile devices, and maybe touch-screen displays in public areas, often for different parts of a learning task.” The information literacy world would benefit from a closer parsing of when and why users switch between devices. The existing data nonetheless permit a few generalizations and recommendations: Information literacy instructors should become familiar with new search methods (such as quick response codes) to help students use them effectively and efficiently; Students should be encouraged to review a range of search results, particularly when searching for academic information; Information literacy instructors should help students understand how to evaluate information, especially when it is presented in a nontraditional form, such as a native app; Students may need assistance from educators in applying information literacy skills they have learned while searching on a laptop or desktop to the mobile environment.

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What factors need to be considered when Developing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Strategy in Higher Education?

Scott Emery (2012) Factors for Consideration when Developing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Strategy in Higher Education, Applied Information Management and the Graduate School of the University of Oregon in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science

The consumerization of IT changes the ways in which IT departments must plan for and manage technology. This annotated bibliography presents factors for consideration by IT leaders in higher education when developing an institution-wide strategy to address the use of personally owned mobile handheld devices, known as bring your own device (BYOD). Literature published between 2007 and 2012 is examined in regards to four categories: (a) policy creation, (b) data security, (c) user education, and (d) mobile learning.

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Does 1:1 laptop computing positively impact student academic engagement and learning?

Jared Keengwe, Gary Schnellert, Chris Mills (2012) Laptop initiative: Impact on instructional technology integration and student learning,  EDUCATION AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES Volume 17, Number 2 (2012), 137-146,

The purpose of this study was to examine how 1:1 laptop initiative affected student learning at a selected rural Midwestern high school. A total of 105 high school students enrolled in 10th–12th grades during the 2008–2009 school year participated in the study. A survey instrument created by the Mitchell Institute was modified and used to collect data on student perceptions and faculty perceptions of the impact of 1:1 laptop computing on student learning and instructional integration of technology in education. Study findings suggest that integration of 1:1 laptop computing positively impacts student academic engagement and student learning. Therefore, there is need for teachers to implement appropriate computing practices to enhance student learning. Additionally, teachers need to collaborate with their students to learn and understand various instructional technology applications beyond basic Internet browsing and word processing.

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How does mobile text messaging allow youth to overcome adult-control?

Mizuko Ito, Daisuke Okabe (2004) Intimate Connections: Contextualizing Japanese Youth and Mobile Messaging, Forthcoming in Richard Harper, Leysia Palen and Alex Taylor Eds., Inside the Text: Social Perspectives on SMS in the Mobile Age

This paper describes social, cultural, and historical contexts that structure current mobile text messaging practices of Japanese youth. First are ways in which mobile messaging has been structured by the power geometries of existing places of home, school, and public places. Second, the paper presents the central social context in which youth peer messaging practice is situated, that of the intimate peer group. Finally, the paper describes how these practices are situated in a postwar history of intergenerational struggle and cultural politics over youth street and communication cultures. Our central argument is that youth technology use is driven not only by certain psychological and developmental imperatives, but also by youths’ position in historically specific social structures. Mobile messaging provides a mechanism through which youth can overcome some of the adult-controlled power structures that govern their everyday lives.

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Is Mobile Communication leading to a New Insularity?

Kenneth J. Gergen (2010) Mobile Communication and the New Insularity,  QWERTY 5, 1 (2010) 14-28

This paper focuses on the reverberations of mobile communication, and most particularly the mobile phone. It examines the role of mobile phone usage in bringing about transformations in communal life. It introduces the metaphor of the floating world, which will facilitate an understanding of a new form of communal life made possible by the mobile phone. The creation of floating worlds generates a new form of insularity. It is not an insularity of individuals, of organizations, or nations, but an informal, micro-social fragmentation. There are implications of this insularity for the socio-political landscape. Cell phone technology may effectively reduce political engagement. However, where political issues are highly salient, it may serve to both harden political divisions and reduce potentials for dialogue.

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How can iPods Facilitate Vocabulary Instruction with ESL Students?

Lucretia M. Fraga, Janis M. Harmon, Karen D. Wood, and Elizabeth Buckelew-Martin (2011) “Digital Word Walls and Vocabulary Learning: The Use of iPods to Facilitate Vocabulary Instruction with ESL Students”, Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology (RCET) Vol. 7, No. 2, Fall 2011

Mobile devices such as iPods can be potentially effective learning tools, especially for advancing the vocabulary development of English as a Second Language (ESL) learners. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to investigate ESL high school students’ knowledge of using iPods for learning vocabulary; and (2) to determine ESL high school students’ achievement differences in vocabulary when exposed to two traditional vocabulary instructional frameworks using word walls versus digital word wall instruction. The study followed a mixed-method design using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The specific strategies used to support vocabulary learning in all three instructional frameworks were based upon the principles of effective vocabulary instruction and factors related to active student engagement. Findings indicate no statistically significant differences between instructional frameworks in word-meaning acquisition. However, students were more engaged in the activities associated with the digital word wall framework, i.e. activities related to developing vocabulary vodcasts.

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Do Libraries need to move to fully mobile websites?

Bridges, Laurie; Rempel, Hannah Gascho; Griggs, Kimberly (2010) Making the case for a fully mobile library web site: from floor maps to the catalog, Reference Services Review, Volume 38, Number 2, 2010 , pp. 309-320(12)

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current state of worldwide mobile usage; mobile technologies; libraries’ use of mobile technologies including a review of library mobile catalog options, both vendor-suplied and in-house created; perspectives from current library leaders and innovators on the importance of incorporating the libraries’ resources into the mobile environment; and future directions for mobile library services. The paper presents a useful source of information for both libraries wishing to create a proposal for a mobile library site, and for libraries that simply want an overview of the current state of mobile use and technologies.

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How should Libraries prepare for eBooks and mobile devices?

Mandy Callow and Kaye England (2011)  Preparing your library for mobile devices m-libraries Conference, 11 – 13 May, 2011

This paper had its beginnings in a discussion at the USQ Library about the necessity, or not, to provide information on the Library‟s website about how eBooks can or cannot be used on mobile devices, specifically eBook readers. Varying sides in the discussion had differing opinions about our students‟, and staff, abilities in using mobile devices and eBooks. The systems team, who were involved in the development of a mobile Library interface, and were themselves proficient users of technology, felt that students and staff needed no instruction, whilst Information Services staff felt that they did.

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What is the potential of m-learning?

Rosman, P. (2008). M-learning – A paradigm of new forms in education. E M Ekonomie a Management11(1), 119-125.

Mobile technologies are a future in e-learning technologies. The paper presents the details of using mobile devices and wireless technologies that could be used for m-learning in education and training. Mobile devices can have more processing power, slicker displays, and more interesting applications than were commonly available on desktop machines ten years ago, and educators are quickly realizing their potential to be used as powerful learning tools. However, the application of mobile technologies to learning contexts must take into account a number of factors. Above all other things, we must consider how mobile learning can be used to provide learners with better opportunities and enhanced learning outcomes. This paper is concerned about the problems of using mobile devices and wireless technologies, a differentiation between teaming and technology as the driver for mobile learning approaches and than the classification of mobile learning activities. M-learning is the exciting art of using mobile technologies to enhance the learning experience. Mobile phones, PDAs, Pocket PCs and the Internet can be blended to engage and motivate learners, any time and anywhere. Handheld devices are emerging as one of the most promising technologies for supporting learning and particularly collaborative learning scenarios; mainly because they offer new opportunities for individuals who require mobile computer solutions that other devices cannot provide. The highly personalized nature of digital mobile devices provides an excellent platform for the development of personalized, learner-centric educational experiences. In paper is emphasized the importance of considering learning over technology, and suggest a pedagogically based framework for developing learner-centric m-learning. The evolution in education and training at a distance can be characterized as a move from distance learning to e-learning and m-learning (mobile learning).

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