Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘iPad’

What kinds of digital didactical designs do teachers apply in their iPad- classes in schools?

Jahnke, Isa, Lars Norqvist, and Andreas Olsson. “Designing for iPad-classrooms.” ECSCW 2013 Adjunct Proceedings (2013).

Our study explores Digital Didactics Designs using mobile technology in co- located settings. Classroom observations and qualitative data were collected in a Danish community where 200 teachers and 2,000 students aged 6-16 use iPads in classrooms implemented in 2012. Based on the theoretical framework called Digital Didactics (DD), five patterns of Digital Didactical Designs and following the innovative designs, three key aspects could be explored: The teachers’ digital didactical designs embrace a) new learning goals where more than one correct answer exists, b) focus on learning as a process in informal-in-formal learning spaces, c) making learning visible in different products (e.g., text, comics, podcasts). The study informs system developers for mobile learning applications in schools and teachers as workplace designers.

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Can Early Years Students Independently Create Music With iPads?

Hodgson, Sarah. “Early Years students can use higher order thinking skills to independently create content in music using touch interface technology.” (2013).

This action research project was initiated to examine the use of touch interface technology,  namely tablet computers, with students in the Early Years. It was an attempt to discover how tablets could best be utilized with young learners. The research indicates that young learners are capable of using higher order thinking skills to create their own content, in this case musical compositions, using tablet technology. It proposes that Early Years students should take active and independent roles in the creation of their own works in order to demonstrate a more powerful understanding of their world.

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What can we learn from the adoption of iPads in Western Australian independent schools?

Mark Pegrum, Grace Oakley and Robert Faulkner (2013) Schools going mobile: A study of the adoption of mobile handheld technologies in Western Australian independent schools, Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 2013, 29(1).

This paper reports on the adoption of mobile handheld technologies in ten Western Australian independent schools, based on interviews with staff conducted in 2011. iPads were the most popular device, followed by iPod Touches and iPhones. Class sets were common at lower levels, with 1:1 models becoming increasingly common at higher levels. Mobile learning, or m-learning, was still at an experimental stage in most schools, but common themes were already emerging around the need to integrate mobile devices into a broader learning ecology. Key discussions focused on their role in promoting consumption or production, collaboration or personalisation, and creating seamless learning spaces. Used for both organisational and pedagogical purposes, mobile devices were seen as enhancing student motivation, with empirical evidence of improved student learning also emerging in small-scale studies conducted by two schools. Challenges included the need to carefully manage the technology, ethical issues in its use, and staff roles in its deployment. Pedagogically grounded and adequately contextualised professional development (PD) was seen as vital for time-poor staff, while a desire to set up a professional community of practice was widely expressed. All the schools surveyed planned to extend their use of mobile handheld technologies in the future.

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What factors affect the Implementation of a 1:1 Learning Environment in a Primary School?

Lee Yong Tay, Siew Khiaw Lim, & Cher Ping Lim  (2013) Factors Affecting the ICT Integration and Implementation of One-To-One Computing Learning Environment in a Primary School – a Sociocultural Perspective in L.Y. Tay & C.P. Lim (eds.), Creating Holistic Technology-Enhanced Learning Experiences, 1–18.

Even with an elaborate technological infrastructure, teaching and learning would not be possible without committed and skilful teachers who are on the ground implementing the day-to-day lessons in their respective classrooms. In addition, directions for the school leadership and channelling of the necessary resources are all critical factors to be considered. A good curriculum plan also provides the necessary structure and procedure on how to integrate ICT in a more seamless and pervasive manner.

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What could an iPad Professional Development Program look like?

Rebecca J. Hogue (2013) iPad Professional Development Program (iPDP), Proceedings of the 11th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning.

Scholars who have studied the adoption of technology in educational settings, believe that professional development is necessary for its successful adoption. This paper addresses a need for an iPad Professional Development Program (iPDP) to support the adoption of iPad tablet computers in higher education teaching and learning. The proposed iPDP is a hybrid program involving both face-to-face learner interventions and online resources. The program is made up of three interrelated components: (a) an online resource that supports the entire program, (b) an introductory workshop (iPadogogy) targeted at pre-adoption learners; and, (c) a knowledge-sharing event targeted at all learners. This paper describes: the components of an iPDP; the design considerations for each of the components; and, the limitation of the proposed iPDP.

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What does research say about iPads in the classroom?

Wilma Clark and Rosemary Luckin (2013) What the research says, iPads in classrooms, London Knowledge Lab, Institute of Education University of London

The adoption and integration of tablet devices into school systems is not without its controversies, and the purpose of this report is to explore if we know enough to demonstrate if, how and when iPads support learning. Our aim is to identify key ideas from the literature on the effective use of iPads and other ‘Post-PC’ tablet devices, to discuss the implications of tablet technologies for school leaders, network managers, teachers, learners and their parents, and to set this within the wider global context.

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How do iPads impact language learning in Kindergarten?

Margareth Sandvik, Ole Smørdal & Svein Østerud (2012) Exploring iPads in Practitioners’ Repertoires for Language Learning and Literacy Practices in Kindergarten, Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 03/2012

We have explored the role of a tablet computer (the Apple iPad) and a shared display as extensions of a practitioner’s repertoire for language learning and literacy practices in a multicultural kindergarten. In collaboration with a practitioner, an intervention was designed that included the use of two iPad apps in a language learning and literacy practice session with a group of 5 children aged 5. We have analysed the conversations around the tablet computers and in front of a shared display, trying to identify types of talk. The roles of the iPads, the apps and the shared display are discussed in relation to the types of talk, engagement and playfulness observed in the activities. We argue that the intervention led to valuable activities for language learning and literacy practices. The two selected apps differ in their levels of structure (directed vs. open) and genre (show and tell vs. fairy tale), and this difference will be discussed in relation to the types of conversation they initiate, and the extent to which they enable the children to transfer experiences from books and hence develop their literacy to include digital and multimodal resources.

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How are Mobile Technologies supporting the Teaching of Literacy in Western Australia?

Grace Oakley, Mark Pegrum, Robert Faulkner & Michelle Striepe (2012) Exploring the Pedagogical Applications of Mobile Technologies for Teaching Literacy, Report for the Association of Independent Schools of Western Australia

Using a multiple case study strategy, this project set out to explore how independent schools in Western Australia were using mobile technologies such as iPads and iPod Touches to support, enhance and transform teaching and learning in the English learning area as well as, more broadly, the area of literacy as a ‘general capability’ across the curriculum.

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Is a second grade student’s silent reading comprehension affected by the use of electronic texts?

Stewart, Shannon M. (2012) Reading in a Technological World: Comparing the iPad to Print, Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, Reading, 2012

The key to improving reading education is to continually asses the most effective methods and strategies. Since the beginning of reading education, paper-based texts have been the focus of, and the tools used with, instruction. However, technological advances could possibly alter the world of reading instruction—and much more quickly than previously thought. In the past years, the electronic book has emerged and poses drastic changes to the paper-based text’s place in the school. In an ever-evolving technological world, more and more schools are choosing to adopt solely electronic texts. Instead of heavy textbooks and full classroom libraries students are now experiencing iPads and iBooks. Due to the fact many schools are moving toward an electronic curriculum, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these new literacies. Therefore, this study was developed to answer the following questions: Is a second grade student’s silent reading comprehension affected when using an electronic reader? Also, how do these students feel about the electronic reader and its use? Data was collected through a short experience survey and comprehension quizzes administered in a second grade classroom of 18 students. The results of this study demonstrated no significant statistical difference between the comprehension of students using the iPad and those reading from a printed text. However, surveys and observations demonstrated an increase in engagement when using the electronic reader in the classroom.

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How can iPads empower and enrich students’ authentic learning experiences?

Ilene R. Berson, Michael J. Berson, and Meghan McGlinn Manfra (2012) Touch, Type, and Transform: iPads in the Social Studies Classroom, Social Education 76(2), pp 88–91, National Council for the Social Studies

If iPads are retrofitted to traditional teaching activities their full potential will go unrealized. The presence of iPads alone will not generate transformative educational experiences; however, the appropriation of the device into school settings may help redefine learning spaces. Teachers who creatively integrate the iPad into instruction to foster communication with the global community and design intentional and purposeful collaborative learning experiences with the device may take learning to new levels of engagement. The functionality offered by the iPad, with its mobility and ubiquitous applications, may be the spark to ignite a movement toward innovation that empowers and enriches students’ authentic, high quality learning experiences.

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iPad: A New Classroom Technology?

Alma L. Culén, Andrea Gasparini (2012) iPad: A New Classroom Technology? A Report From Two Pilot Studies, INFuture2011: “Information Sciences and e-Society”

In this paper we discuss two pilot studies involving the use of iPads for active reading in a teaching/learning situation. This is part of a broader study of how introducing tablet PCs may transform the work and learning practices of learners. One of the pilot studies was conducted in a graduate level course, involving 40 university students. The other study involved 26 fourth grade elementary schoolchildren. The results concerning acceptance of the technology were vastly different in the two studies. We find the comparison to be very interesting in several aspects, most notably on the issue of ownership and perceived useful- ness. We hope that our experience with these pilot studies may be of use and interest for a wider community. Our research method is based on ethnography (in-class observations), enriched by workshops, questionnaires, group and individual interviews involving students, faculty and, in the case of elementary schoolchildren, families. The data from interviews has been consolidated and mapped out into an affinity diagram. The resulting diagram shows clearly issues that should be further addressed, as well as areas where changes in study- related work practices may occur. This paper offers some reflections on differences and similarities observed in the two study situations.

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What is the Potential of iPad Used in Mobile-learning?

HongYing Zhang, J David Betts (2012) The Analysis of the Potential Capability of iPad Used in Mobile-learning, 2012 2nd International Conference on Future Computers in Education, Lecture Notes in Information Technology, Vols.23-24

Considering the hardware and software features of the iPad, we suggest that iPad is an ideal device for mobile learning (M-learning). The advantages of using iPad in M-learning are discussed on five aspects, i.e., access to digital learning sources, multiple communication channels for M-learning, multi-media learning environments, opportunities for personal learning, and new literacies in M-learning. Some practices of iPad use in M-learning are provided, as well as some suggestions.

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What tools do teens use to communicate?

Amanda Lenhart (2012) Teens, Smartphones & Texting, Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project

Teens are fervent communicators. Straddling childhood and adulthood, they communicate frequently with a variety of important people in their lives: friends and peers, parents, teachers, coaches, bosses, and a myriad of other adults and institutions. This report examines the tools teens use to communicate, with a particular focus on mobile devices, and then places the use of those tools in the broader context of how teens choose to communicate with people in their lives.

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Does the use of Place Affect Learner Engagement? The Case of GeoStoryteller on the Streets of New York

Drs. Anthony Cocciolo and Debbie Rabina (2012) Does the use of Place Affect Learner Engagement? The Case of GeoStoryteller on the Streets of New York, Proceedings of the 2012 iConference

The aim of this research project is to uncover if place-based learning can increase learner engagement and understanding of historical topics. To study this, learners will use GeoStoryteller to learn about a historical topic on the places where those events occurred, and then be interviewed by the researchers. GeoStoryteller is a tool developed by the researchers that runs on smart phones such as Apple’s iPhone. It provides the user multimedia stories about the historical sites, delivered via the mobile web or through Layar, an augmented reality web browser. Place provides the learner with a meaningful entry point to the topic and one that increases the topic’s prominence within an information environment that is seemingly limitless. This environment—for those who have broadband connections to the Internet—is constantly growing in interesting facts and resources yet proves difficult for the user in determining what is worth knowing, creating what individuals often describe as information overload (e.g., Shirky, 2008). Whereas the Internet is seemingly unbounded, geographic space has the advantage of being finite and inherently understood. Providing users with meaningful entry points to information, such as through the use of already familiar places, is hypothesized to increase engagement and subsequent understanding.

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How can Libraries use iPads to survey students?

Jennifer Link Jones, Bryan Sinclair (2011) Assessment on the Go: Surveying Students With an iPad, Library Innovation Volume 2, Issue 2, 2011

Ongoing assessment in academic libraries, particularly the measurement of student perceptions, preferences, and satisfaction, can be a challenge to schedule and execute. This paper describes a pilot project at Georgia State University Library that combined assessment with the portability of the tablet computer. A tablet computer–in this case, Apple’s iPad–loaded with survey software became a digital clipboard with the added benefit of automatic data compilation. Subjects were surveyed quickly in the library buildings, maximizing convenience for both subjects and researchers alike. The result was a model that other libraries, as well as campus student services divisions and classroom instructors, can easily adopt. Methodology, benefits, lessons learned, and ideas for future projects are discussed.

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How should Libraries prepare for eBooks and mobile devices?

Mandy Callow and Kaye England (2011)  Preparing your library for mobile devices m-libraries Conference, 11 – 13 May, 2011

This paper had its beginnings in a discussion at the USQ Library about the necessity, or not, to provide information on the Library‟s website about how eBooks can or cannot be used on mobile devices, specifically eBook readers. Varying sides in the discussion had differing opinions about our students‟, and staff, abilities in using mobile devices and eBooks. The systems team, who were involved in the development of a mobile Library interface, and were themselves proficient users of technology, felt that students and staff needed no instruction, whilst Information Services staff felt that they did.

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How can Libraries develop strategies for phones, ipads and other mobile devices?

Munro, K., Stevenson, K., Stenson, R., Walker, W. and Fisher, C. (2011Planning for the mobile library: a strategy for managing innovation and transformation at the University of Glasgow Library. Serials: the Journal for the Serials Community, 24 . S26-S31.

Modern mobile devices have powerful features that are transforming access to information. Lippincott1 argues that as mobile devices such as smartphones become ‘key information devices’ for our users, libraries will want to have a significant presence in offering content and services that are suitable for this medium. This article outlines the process of development and implementation of a mobile strategy at the University of Glasgow Library. The most popular devices our users had were smartphones such as the iPhone, BlackBerry and those with the Android operating system, and also the iPad. What began as an investigation into a mobile interface to the library catalogue evolved into a comprehensive strategic review of how we deliver services now and in the future in this rapidly changing mobile environment.

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How can the iPad support EFL Digital Literacy?

Robert C Meurant (2010) The iPad and EFL Digital Literacy, Signal Processing and Multimedia (2010) Volume: 123

In future, the uses of English by non-native speakers will predominantly be online, using English language digital resources, and in computer mediated communication with other non-native speakers of English. Thus for Korea to be competitive in the global economy, its EFL should develop L2 Digital Literacy in English. With its fast Internet connections, Korea is the most wired nation on Earth; but ICT facilities in educational institutions need reorganization. Opportunities for computer-mediated second language learning need to be increased, providing multimedia-capable, mobile web solutions that put the Internet into the hands of all students and teachers. Wi-Fi networked campuses allow any campus space to act as a wireless classroom. Every classroom should have a teacher’s computer console. All students should be provided with adequate computing facilities, that are available anywhere, anytime. Ubiquitous computing has now become feasible by providing every student on enrollment with a tablet: a Wi-Fi+3G enabled Apple iPad.

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How does the iPad Contribute to Mobile Learning?

Melhuish, K. & Falloon, G. (2010). Looking to the future: M-learning with the iPad. Computers in New Zealand Schools: Learning, Leading, Technology , 22 (3).

This paper explores the potential affordances and limitations of the Apple iPad in the wider context of emergent mobile learning theory, and the social and economic drivers that fuel technology development. Against the background of effective teaching and learning, the functionality offered by the iPad, and its potential uses for learning, are discussed. A critical review of the way the iPad may support learning, that draws on learning theory, contemporary articles and e-learning literature, suggests that the device may offer an exciting platform for consuming and creating content in a collaborative, interactive way. However, of greater importance is that effective, evidence-driven, innovative practices, combined with a clear-sighted assessment of the advantages and limitations of any product, should take priority over the device itself.

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What is the potential of the iPad in schools?

Henrik Valstad (2010) iPad as a pedagogical device, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, TDT4520, Program and Information Systems, Specialization Project

This research paper dwelves into what kind of experiences exists with using the iPad in an educational setting, what can be learned from these experiences, and how the educational sector may benefit from bringing the iPad into the classroom. Chapter 2 considers the iPad’s technological features together with the iTunes App Store and its own educational app category. Then, Chapter 3 turns to the issue of app distribution among students and how to setup iPad configuration profiles. After this, Chapter 4 demonstrates the iPad’s pedagogical potential with examples, lists samples of apps that can be used for note taking and educational purposes and important success factors which should be read carefully if the iPad is to be used as a pedagogical device in a classroom

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How does the iPad perform at college level?

Trina Marmarelli, Martin Ringle (2011), The Reed College iPad Study, The Reed Institute

When Apple announced the release of its iPad tablet in late January 2010, Reed College had just completed a semester-long study of the Amazon Kindle DX eReader in which students and faculty in three upper-division seminars used the Kindle to read, annotate, and discuss books and articles for the courses.1 While the Kindle DX failed to meet faculty and student needs in several important ways, most notably highlighting, annotation, and manipulation of texts, the study participants were optimistic enough about the long-term potential of eReader technology to prompt the College to continue its evaluation of emerging products. Consequently, during the fall semester of 2010, we undertook a study parallel in structure to the 2009 Kindle DX study. Students in one upper-division seminar, Political Science 422: Nuclear Politics — The origins and effects of the spread of nuclear weapons, used the iPad for all of their assigned readings. Since this was one of the courses included in the Kindle study and much of the reading list was unchanged, comparisons between student reactions were easy to make. We anticipated that a multipurpose device like the iPad would have different strengths and weaknesses than the Kindle DX, a dedicated eReader, and we were particularly interested in examining these differences.

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What is the potential of m-learning?

Rosman, P. (2008). M-learning – A paradigm of new forms in education. E M Ekonomie a Management11(1), 119-125.

Mobile technologies are a future in e-learning technologies. The paper presents the details of using mobile devices and wireless technologies that could be used for m-learning in education and training. Mobile devices can have more processing power, slicker displays, and more interesting applications than were commonly available on desktop machines ten years ago, and educators are quickly realizing their potential to be used as powerful learning tools. However, the application of mobile technologies to learning contexts must take into account a number of factors. Above all other things, we must consider how mobile learning can be used to provide learners with better opportunities and enhanced learning outcomes. This paper is concerned about the problems of using mobile devices and wireless technologies, a differentiation between teaming and technology as the driver for mobile learning approaches and than the classification of mobile learning activities. M-learning is the exciting art of using mobile technologies to enhance the learning experience. Mobile phones, PDAs, Pocket PCs and the Internet can be blended to engage and motivate learners, any time and anywhere. Handheld devices are emerging as one of the most promising technologies for supporting learning and particularly collaborative learning scenarios; mainly because they offer new opportunities for individuals who require mobile computer solutions that other devices cannot provide. The highly personalized nature of digital mobile devices provides an excellent platform for the development of personalized, learner-centric educational experiences. In paper is emphasized the importance of considering learning over technology, and suggest a pedagogically based framework for developing learner-centric m-learning. The evolution in education and training at a distance can be characterized as a move from distance learning to e-learning and m-learning (mobile learning).

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