Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘inverted classroom’

Blended Learning or E-learning?

Maryam Tayebinik, Marlia Puteh (2012) Blended Learning or E-learning? International Magazine on Advances in Computer Science and Telecommunications, volume 3 number 1 february 2012 , Special Issue on International Conference on Advanced Information System, E-Education and Development ICAISED 2012, Malaysia

ICT or Information and Communication Technology has pervaded the fields of education. In recent years the term “e-learning” has emerged as a result of the integration of ICT in the education fields. Following the application this technology into teaching, some pitfalls have been identified and this have led to the “Blended learning” phenomenon. However, the preference on this new method has been debated quite extensively. The aim of this paper is to investigate the advantages of blended learning over face-to-face instruction through reviews of related literature. The present survey revealed that blended learning is more favorable than pure e- learning and offers many advantages for learners like producing a sense of community or belonging. This study concludes that blended learning can be considered as an efficient approach of distance learning in terms of students’ learning experience, student-student interaction as well as student-instructor interaction and is likely to emerge as the predominant education model in the future.

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How can digital backchannels support student participation?

François Bry, Vera Gehlen-Baum, Alexander Pohl (2011) Promoting Awareness and  Participation in Large Class Lectures: The Digital Backchannel Backstage, Proceedings of the IADIS

This article reports on the conception of a novel digital backchannel, code name Backstage, dedicated to large classes aiming at empowering not only the audience but also the speaker, at promoting the awareness of both audience and speaker, and at promoting an active participation of students in the lecture. The backchannel supports different forms of inter-student communication via short microblog messages, social evaluation and ranking of messages by the students themselves, and aggregation of student’s opinions aiming at increasing the students’ community feeling, strengthening the students’ awareness of and co-responsibility for the class work aiming at promoting the students’ participation in the lecture. The backchannel further supports immediate concise feedback to the lecturer of selected and aggregated students’ opinions aiming at strengthening the lecturer’s awareness for students’ difficulties.

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Is Self-Paced Learning in an Inverted Classroom Environment (SPLICE) the way to go?

Curt Clifton and Matt Boutell (2010) SPLICE: Self-Paced Learning in an Inverted Classroom Environment, Grant proposal for the Rose-Hulman Summer Professional Development Grants

Learning to program is hard for many students. Practice with an expert coach is key to overcoming this challenge. We adopted the 3Å~2 format for our introductory courses to give students such mentored practice. In a single class session, students learn a concept, experiment with it, and apply it to a real problem, all with expert coaching at hand. While this format has been effective, we still find two significant problems: time and pace. Time is an issue because presenting concepts, showing examples, and modeling problem solving decreases the time available for mentored practice. Pace is an issue because some students arrive with confidence and prior experience and are thus bored, while other students struggle and become overwhelmed. To address these problems, we propose creating on-line videos for introductory programming courses to present concepts, show examples, and model the problem solving process. As a result, our students will spend every class session entirely in active learning activities with expert coaching, receive more individual attention, and set their own pace.

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How effective is self-paced learning?

Jonathan G Tullis, Aaron S Benjamin (2011) On the effectiveness of self-paced learning, Journal of Memory and LanguageVolume 64, Issue 2, February 2011, Pages 109-118

Metacognitive monitoring and control must be accurate and efficient in order to allow self-guided learners to improve their performance. Yet few examples exist in which allowing learners to control learning produces higher levels of performance than restricting learners’ control. Here we investigate the consequences of allowing learners to self-pace study of a list of words on later recognition, and show that learners with control of study-time allocation significantly outperformed subjects with no control, even when the total study time was equated between groups (Experiments 1 and 2). The self-pacing group also outperformed a group for which study time was automatically allocated as a function of normative item difficulty (Experiment 2). The advantage of self-pacing was apparent only in subjects who utilized a discrepancy reduction strategy-that is, who allocated more study time to normatively difficult items. Self-pacing can improve memory performance, but only when appropriate allocation strategies are used.

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How can podcasts support inverted classrooms?

Gannod, G. C. (2007) Work in progress — Using podcasting in an inverted classroom, Frontiers in education conference global engineering knowledge without borders opportunities without passports 2007 FIE07 37th annual (2007)

An inverted classroom is a teaching environment that mixes the use of technology with hands on activities. In an inverted classroom, typical in-class lecture time is replaced with laboratory and in-class activities. Outside of class, lectures are delivered over some other medium such as video on-demand. As such, learning activities, which typically are done outside of class, are done in-class in the presence of the instructor. Passive activities, such as listening to lectures, are performed outside of class. In this paper, we describe the use of podcasting in an inverted classroom environment with the explicit goal of reclaiming lecture time for in-class laboratories and learning activities. This Work-in- Progress paper focuses primarily upon the description of the approach being piloted, technologies being utilized, and the characteristics of the pilot course.

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How can Youtube help Flipping a Classroom?

Carlisle, M. C., (2010) Using YouTube to Enhance Student Class Preparation in an Introductory Java Course, Proceedings of the 41st ACM technical symposium on Computer science education

We provided 21 short YouTube videos for an Introduction to Programming in Java course. Students were surveyed on how often they watched the videos and did the readings, and how much these activites contributed to their learning. When professors reduced lecture time and increased lab time, students watched videos and read significantly more. Their test scores were at least as high and they indicated they would prefer to not have more lecture. The YouTube videos also provided a source of outreach for the university, drawing a large number of views, including the 13-17 year-old demographic.

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