Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘internet’

How can we cope with the ever-changing face of plagiarism?

Wendy Sutherland-Smith (2008) Plagiarism, the Internet, and Student Learning: Improving Academic Integrity, Routledge

Sutherland-Smith presents a model of plagiarism, called the plagiarism continuum, which usefully informs discussion and direction of plagiarism management in most educational settings. The model was developed from a cross-disciplinary examination of plagiarism with a particular focus on understanding how educators and students perceive and respond to issues of plagiarism. The evolution of plagiarism, from its birth in Law, to a global issue, poses challenges to international educators in diverse cultural settings. The case studies included are the voices of educators and students discussing the complexity of plagiarism in policy and practice, as well as the tensions between institutional and individual responses. A review of international studies plus qualitative empirical research on plagiarism, conducted in Australia between 2004-2006, explain why it has emerged as a major issue. The book examines current teaching approaches in light of issues surrounding plagiarism, particularly Internet plagiarism. The model affords insight into ways in which teaching and learning approaches can be enhanced to cope with the ever-changing face of plagiarism. This book challenges Higher Education educators, managers and policy-makers to examine their own beliefs and practices in managing the phenomenon of plagiarism in academic writing.

Read Full Text

How are Chinese Elementary Schools fostering the country’s Digital Divide?

YIHUA YANG, LINXIU ZHANG, XIAO HU, QINGHE QU, FANG LAI, YAOJIANG SHI, MATTHEW BOSWELL, SCOTT ROZELLE (2012) The Roots of Tomorrow’s Digital Divide: Documenting Computer Use and Internet Access in China’s Elementary Schools Today

The goal of this paper is to explore the nature of China’s digital divide with a focus on differences in access to computers, learning software, and internet at school and home among different groups of elementary school-aged children in China. Using data from a set of large scale surveys in schools in different parts of the country, we find the gap between computer and internet access of students in rural areas and urban public school students is extremely wide. The gap widens further when comparing urban students to students from minority areas. The gap is less wide when comparing computer access and access to teaching of the most basic computer skills across urban and rural public schools. However, the divide is still large between urban and rural schools when examining the quality of computer instruction and access to learning software. Migration itself does not appear to eliminate the digital divide. Only when migrant families are able to enroll their children into urban schools does the divide substantially narrow. If the digital divide in elementary schools today is a harbinger of employment, education, and income inequality tomorrow, China needs to seriously address this issue in the near future.

Read Full Text

What is the Impact of Internet Access at Home and/or School on Students’ Academic Performance in Brazil?

Badasyan, Narine and Silva, Simone, (2012) The Impact of Internet Access at Home and/or School on Students’ Academic Performance in Brazil, Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2133609

This paper uses propensity scores matching techniques to examine the impact of Internet on 8th grade students’ academic achievement, as measured by their test scores in Portuguese and mathematics, for years 2007 and 2009. In both years, the results suggest that Internet access at home has a considerable positive impact on test scores of 8th graders in both mathematics and Portuguese. These paper’s findings have interesting implications from a policy perspective. In the past decade policymakers in many countries, including Brazil, have allocated substantial funds to increase Internet access at schools. Previous research suggest that the efforts to increase Internet access at schools can result in much higher magnitude of improvement of students’ academic performance if they are combined with policy initiatives to increase home Internet access. This paper provides further evidence to this view and argues that school internet access should be combined with policies to increase the instructors’ awareness of the importance of internet as a pedagogical tool.

Read Full Text

How is internet safety promoted and managed within schools?

Don Passey  (2011) Internet Safety in the Context of Developing Aspects of Young People’s Digital Citizenship, Department of Educational Research, Lancaster University

In the study reported here, specific evidence has been gathered about perceived and real risks of using the internet and digital devices, how issues are managed, issues concerned with access to and uses of social networking sites, the use of mobile telephones or handheld devices, and how internet safety is promoted and managed within schools.

Read Full Text

Why do users choose Google Chrome?

J. Ken Corley, D. Scott Hunsinger (2012) Google Chrome and the Paradigm Shifts in the Browser Market Among Users, Journal of Information Systems Applied Research (JISAR), 5(3)

Google Chrome has quickly become one of the most popular Internet browsers since its release in September 2008. The results of this study provides evidence suggesting two of the three independent factors shown to influence behavioral intention within the Theory of Planned Behavior (Attitude and Perceived Behavioral Control) are significantly and positively correlated with a person’s intentions to use the Google Chrome Browser.

Read Full Text

What are the legal risks facing young people using network sites?

David Lindsay, Melissa de Zwart, Michael Henderson, Michael Phillips (2011) Understanding legal risks facing children and young people using social network sites, Telecommunications Journal of Australia, Vol.61, No1 (2011)

Children and young people are increasingly participating in everyday use of Social Networking Sites (SNS), such as Facebook or MySpace, to the extent that such interactions have come to be seen as an essential part of growing up. To date, mainstream discussion and policy debates about young people and SNS have tended to focus on high profile risks associated with these activities, such as cyber-bullying and online grooming of children by adults. While not dismissing the potential risks of SNS use by young people, it is important to understand the potential benefits that may accrue from online social interactions, including the acquisition of social and technical skills that are likely to be important for future digital citizens. Moreover, it is also important not to ignore other potential, albeit less dramatic, risks that may arise from SNS use. This article focuses on the range of legal risks that children and young people may face in their everyday use of SNS.  The article concludes with an analysis of the research findings, and some suggestions as to how the popularity of SNS with young people may be used to engage students in learning about, and debating, the application of the law to online activities, especially the use of SNS.

Read Full Text

What does a social and cultural archeology of the internet look like?

Geert Willem Lovink (2009) Dynamics of Critical Internet Culture (1994-2001), Submitted in total fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, November 2002 English Department University of Melbourne

Unlike much of the cultural studies literature and early media theory, I will not describe what an email is, what MUDs and MOOs are and compare the Internet with book culture or television. In my view the question of what the Internet is all about has been sufficiently dealt with. It is time for critical research to move on, away from the general level of functionality. It is no longer the technical possibilities that characterize the medium. Instead of, yet again, going through general possibilities my research is based on empirical data: emails, webpages, events and personal encounters with the players in the field—both real and virtual. Where possible and useful I have made references to other (online) literature. It is my aim to write a contemporary form of media archeology in which I map the social and cultural usages of the Internet. I am writing early histories of a selected group of techno-cultural networks.

Read Full Text

Should school policies protect students from social networking?

Jacqueline Vickery (2011) Why can’t we be (Facebook) friends? Social Networking, risk & school policies, Presented at the EU Kids Online ConferenceLondonSept22-232011

This paper analyzes educational policies within the United States in order to assess how risk is constructed in various social media policies. Policies tend to overstate the role of technology as both the problem and the solution which leads to techno-phobic policies. Additionally, such policies shut down opportunities for student and teacher engagement in both the formal and informal learning spaces. A more nuanced understanding of risk and the role of teachers as mediators is needed to ensure policies are empowering rather than hindering kids’ online engagement.

Read Full Text

How are secondary school students using the internet in Nigeria?

Ukpebor Osaretin Christopher and Emwanta Maria-Gorretti (2012) Availability and the use of computer and internet by secondary school students in Benin City, Nigeria, International Journal of Library and Information Science Vol. 4(2), pp. 16-23, February 2012

This study identifies the availability of internet use among 1000 secondary schools students Benin City, Nigeria. Internet has become a useful tool for education. Access to information communication technology (ICT), the internet in particular, has provided people especially students with a foundation for meeting their information needs. Many private schools can boast of computer laboratories, but only few can pride themselves on Internet access. Another frustration is the capacity to use the Internet. 1000 students were selected from 20 private secondary schools across the two (out of three) local government of Benin City. Result showed that students have the capacity to use the internet which they learnt from friends and family members. However, the level of internet access in schools is poor despite the schools having computer laboratories. Students access the internet from their homes and cyber cafes since they are denied access in their respective schools while most of the students use the internet for educational activities. Internet availability should be considered as one of the most important scientific tools in schools.

Read Full Text 

What do students believe about the influence of the Internet on their learning?

Yifat Ben-David Kolikant (2010) Digital natives, better learners? Students’ beliefs about how the Internet influenced their ability to learn, Computers in Human Behavior xxx (2010) xxx–xxx

In the literature students are sometimes assumed to feel empowered with respect to learning because of their familiarity with and access to ICT. However, after interviewing 25 students from post-elementary schools, it was found that the majority of the students, although they use the Internet and other ICT for school purposes, believed that their generation is not as good at learning as the pre-ICT generation. Several students explained the situation in terms of the school’s failure to build on their abilities. Nonetheless, the majority believed that the Internet over-simplifies schoolwork (perceived primarily as the traditional processing of textual sources), which in turn diminishes learning abilities. These results carry important implications regarding school, given that low self-efficacy might make students less likely to apply themselves to learning.

Read Full Text

How are students and teachers using Facebook?

Khe Foon Hew (2011) Students’ and teachers’ use of Facebook, Computers in Human Behavior 27 (2011) 662–676

The purpose of this article is to review current published research studies focusing on the use of Facebook by students and teachers. The aim of the review is not to solely discuss Facebook in relation to teaching or learning purposes, or about its educational value per se, but also to present a detailed account of the participants’ Facebook usage profile or the extent to which users are engaged in Facebook activities. The emphasis of this review will be upon empirical findings rather than opinion- or theoretical explanations. The conclusions overall suggest that Facebook thus far has very little educational use, that students use Facebook mainly to keep in touch with known individuals, and that students tend to disclose more personal information about themselves on Facebook.

Read Full Text

Is there such a thing as Privacy Online? Let’s be realistic and talk about Contextual Integrity…

Helen Nissenbaum (2004) Privacy as Contextual Integrity, WASHINGTON LAW REVIEW, 2004

This Article, which extends earlier work on the problem of privacy in public, explains why some of the prominent theoretical approaches to privacy, which were developed over time to meet traditional privacy challenges, yield unsatisfactory conclusions. It posits a new construct, “contextual integrity,” as an alternative benchmark for privacy, to capture the nature of challenges posed by information technologies. Contextual integrity ties adequate protection for privacy to norms of specific contexts, demanding that information gathering and dissemination be appropriate to that context and obey the governing norms of distribution within it. Building on the idea of “spheres of justice,” developed by political philosopher Michael Walzer, this Article argues that public surveillance violates a right to privacy because it violates contextual integrity; as such, it constitutes injustice and even tyranny.

Read Full Text

How can Web 2.0 Tools be used to promote Digital Citizenship?

Reshan Richards (2010) Digital Citizenship and Web 2 . 0 Tools, Learning (2010) Volume: 6, Issue: 2, Pages: 516-522

This concept paper explores citizenship in a digital age. The potential of Web 2.0 tools highlights the importance of educational institutions’ consideration of the use of these tools in school settings to promote citizenship at a time when students are already exposed to powerful online communication platforms. First, a description of three Web 2.0 tools, blogs, wikis, and online social networks, is provided. This is followed by an exploration of digital citizenship. Then, several cases in recent history where Web 2.0 tools played an important part in promoting democracy and social justice are examined. Finally, using a lens of digital citizenship, several instructional suggestions are provided for educators to help students experience and understand multiple layers of citizenship in a 21st  century technological landscape.

Read Full Text

How Risky Are Social Networking Sites?

Michele L Ybarra, Kimberly J Mitchell (2008) How Risky Are Social Networking Sites? A Comparison of Places Online Where Youth Sexual Solicitation and Harassment Occurs, Pediatrics (2008) Volume: 121, Issue: 2, Pages: 2007–357

OBJECTIVE. Recently, public attention has focused on the possibility that social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook are being widely used to sexually solicit underage youth, consequently increasing their vulnerability to sexual victimization. Beyond anecdotal accounts, however, whether victimization is more commonly reported in social networking sites is unknown. RESULTS. Fifteen percent of all of the youth reported an unwanted sexual solicitation online in the last year; 4% reported an incident on a social networking site specifically. Thirty-three percent reported an online harassment in the last year; 9% reported an incident on a social networking site specifically. Among targeted youth, solicitations were more commonly reported via instant messaging (43%) and in chat rooms (32%), and harassment was more commonly reported in instant messaging (55%) than through social networking sites (27% and 28%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. Broad claims of victimization risk, at least defined as unwanted sexual solicitation or harassment, associated with social networking sites do not seem justified. Prevention efforts may have a greater impact if they focus on the psychosocial problems of youth instead of a specific Internet application, including funding for online youth outreach programs, school antibullying programs, and online mental health services.

Read Full Text

How exposed are youth to unwanted material on the internet?

Kimberly J Mitchell, David Finkelhor, Janis Wolak (2003) The Exposure Of Youth To Unwanted Sexual Material On The Internet: A National Survey of Risk, Impact, and Prevention, Youth Society (2003) Volume: 34, Issue: 3, Publisher: Sage Publications, Pages: 330-358

This national survey of youth ages 10 to 17 yrs, and their caretakers has several implications for the current debate about young people and Internet pornography. Using an Internet survey, the authors found that 25% of youth had unwanted exposure to sexual pictures on the Internet in the past year, challenging the prevalent assumption that the problem is primarily about young people motivated seek out pornography. Most youth had no negative reactions to their unwanted exposure, but one quarter said they were very of extremely upset suggesting a priority need for more research on and interventions directed toward such negative effects. The use of filtering and blocking software was associated with a modest reduction in unwanted exposure suggesting that it may help but is far from foolproof. Various forms of parental supervision were not associated with any reduction in exposure.

Read Full Text

How can HOT blogging promote Higher Order Thinking?

Zawilinski, L. (2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher62(8), 650-661. International Reading Association.

The article focuses on the use of educational blogs by elementary school teachers and students to encourage computer learning and literacy. The most commonly used blogs (also known as weblogs) in the classroom are: News blogs which report information about classroom schedules and homework; Mirror blogs in which the writers reflect on new ideas; Literature response blogs where teachers and students consider reading assignments; and Showcase blogs which post student work such as podcasts and art work. The article also discusses classroom and Internet resources available to help implement such technologies into a lesson plan.

Read Full Text

Can blogs support students’ complex thinking?

Ramos, Maria Altina Silva. Blog and Complex Thinking: A Case Study
Online Submission, US-China Education Review v7 n8 p11-21 Aug 2010. 2010 11 pp. (ED514801)

The Internet does not promote learning by itself as children and young people often use it passively. The teachers’ role is to help them interpret and analyze available information critically. The blog, as a means to deploy the concept of “on-line interaction” is, according to Granieri, “The most accessible and natural tool for sharing and publishing, in addition to text, images movies and also sound, will be increasingly disseminated, because of increasing speed of data transmission” (2006, p. 31). It is therefore natural that the use of the blog is more and more frequent as a resource, pedagogical strategy or other capacities at all levels of teaching (Gomes, 2005). In this paper, a case study is presented based on some blogs, focusing on: the methodology for collection of text and multimedia materials; treatment and analysis of data with the NVivo software; findings and further evolution perspectives. Read Full Text.

Tag Cloud