Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘instructional technology’

How do high school math teachers use technology to teach geometry?

Melanie Lolli (2012) The Views of High School Geometry Teachers regarding the Effect of Technology on Student Learning, Honors Thesis Final Project, Ohio Dominican University

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics claims that technology is necessary to student learning in math and, in fact, enhances it. There are some studies to support this claim, but these studies leave some unanswered questions. The purpose of this study was to find out from current high school math teachers, of geometry specifically, what their views of technology are. The goal of the study was to ask these teachers which technologies they use and whether they believe technology has beneficial effects on student learning. This study did find a consensus among the participants as to which technologies they felt were the most beneficial in their classrooms, as well as those that might not be needed at all in a classroom.

Read Full Text

Advertisements

Does 1:1 laptop computing positively impact student academic engagement and learning?

Jared Keengwe, Gary Schnellert, Chris Mills (2012) Laptop initiative: Impact on instructional technology integration and student learning,  EDUCATION AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES Volume 17, Number 2 (2012), 137-146,

The purpose of this study was to examine how 1:1 laptop initiative affected student learning at a selected rural Midwestern high school. A total of 105 high school students enrolled in 10th–12th grades during the 2008–2009 school year participated in the study. A survey instrument created by the Mitchell Institute was modified and used to collect data on student perceptions and faculty perceptions of the impact of 1:1 laptop computing on student learning and instructional integration of technology in education. Study findings suggest that integration of 1:1 laptop computing positively impacts student academic engagement and student learning. Therefore, there is need for teachers to implement appropriate computing practices to enhance student learning. Additionally, teachers need to collaborate with their students to learn and understand various instructional technology applications beyond basic Internet browsing and word processing.

Read Full Text

Are Instructional Design and Educational Technology Overlooked by Academic Library Administrators?

John D. Shank, Nancy H. Dewald (2012), Academic Library Administrators’ Perceptions of Four Instructional Skills, College & Research Libraries vol. 73 no. 1 78-93

The profession is in the midst of an unprecedented paradigm shift, moving from print-based to digital-based information. This dramatic change is impacting, and will continue to impact, the academic library. Clearly, it is vital to have highly skilled employees who are able to rapidly adapt to the changes as well as drive the innovations within the field. This study raises a very big question: who is responsible for driving that process? If, as the authors suppose, library administrators are key players in facilitating the hiring of new or redefined positions, then, based on the survey data, library administrators might be restraining change within the educational role of the library because of their biases.

Read Full Text

What could Computer Science look like in the Elementary School?

Katherine Gunion (2008) FUNdamentals of CS: Designing and Evaluating Computer Science Activities for Kids, University of British Columbia, A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE in the Department of Computer Science

Computer Science is not included in high school or middle school education in British Columbia. Young students are not exposed to Computer Science when they are learning their fundamentals. Given the correct abstractions like kinesthetic learn- ing activities and graphical programming languages, elementary school students can be exposed to computer science and can understand sophisticated topics like recursion and concurrency. This means that more students’ interest will be piqued and they will be exposed to sophisticated concepts before first year computer science.

Read Full Text

Do Interactive Whiteboards Motivate Elementary Students with Mathematics?

Bruce Torff , Rose Tirotta (2009) Interactive whiteboards produce small gains in elementary students’ self-reported motivation in mathematics, Computers & Education 54 (2010) 379–383

A treatment/control study (N = 773) was conducted to determine the extent to which use of interactive whiteboard technology (IWB) was associated with upper elementary students’ self-reported level of motivation in mathematics. Students in the treatment group reported higher levels of motivation relative to control students, but the effect was extremely weak. Students with teachers who were more supportive of IWB technology reported higher motivation levels (compared to students of teachers who were less supportive), but this effect also was very small. Claims about the motivation-enhancing effects of the IWB are not baseless, but they appear to be somewhat overstated. Research is needed to determine how IWB- use is associated with academic performance, and also to examine how teachers use the IWB and how this usage could be strengthened.

Read Full Text

How can Digital Literacies make learning and teaching more effective?

Julia Gillen, David Barton (2010) Digital Literacies: A Research Briefing by the Technology Enhanced Learning phase of the Teaching and Learning Research Programme, English

The concept of digital literacies is fascinating both in its definition and its application. The term captures an arena of rapidly developing practices, as humans interact with technologies in new ways and for innovative purposes. Many time-honoured distinctions such as between producer and consumer, writer and reader blur or virtually disappear as new syntheses emerge. There are a number of valuable approaches to digital literacies that overlap with one another. Rather than look for clear distinctions to demarcate them, it is perhaps more helpful to look for continuities and commonalities.

Read Full Text

Do teachers need media-competences instead of ICT competences?

Bert Zwaneveld, Theo Bastiaens (2010) ICT competences of the teacher: About supporting learning and teaching processes with the use of ICT, International Federation for Information

Our starting observation is that there is a lot of literature about the use of ICT in teaching. Much of this literature with frameworks, schemes, flow charts etcetera, is about the process of introducing ICT in teaching. In our view the teacher and his or her main concerns, the learning and teaching processes inside the classroom, deserves much more attention. Our second observation is that there are much relevant new ICT-tools available which can support these learning and teaching processes. So, we focus in this paper on these aspects: what are the most important competences with respect to ICT for a teacher in order to support these learning and teaching processes? Because there are nowadays so many modern digital media available we propose the term media-competences for the teachers instead of ICT competences.

Read Full Text

How do institutional forces shape ICT in education?

Jonathan Ezer (2005) The Interplay of Institutional Forces Behind Higher ICT Education in India, Submitted in Fulfilment of the Full Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Information Systems, London School of Economics and Political Sciences

For several years, academics have debated the extent to which ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) can help poor people in developing countries. The conversation contains diverse views, yet education is always given a prominent role. Education helps shape how people think about technology and in turn, how the technology is used. This dissertation examines how the idea of ICTs is constructed at Indian universities, and how this process is impacted by institutional forces. The research findings indicate that for a variety of reasons, higher ICT education in India is markedly Western-focused, instrumental and technocratic. These characteristics of higher ICT education in India are impacted by a process that can be described as institutional collaboration – several diverse institutional forces are acting in ways that a re coherent and mutually reinforcing.

Read Full Text

How is ICT changing the field of education?

Alison Hudson (2009) New Professionals and New Technologies in New Higher Education? Conceptualising struggles in the field, Umeå University, Department of Interactive Media and Learning (IML)

This thesis explores the practices and positionings of two groupings of professionals in UK higher education, ‘educational developers’ and ‘learning technologists’. It investigates the emergence of the groupings, and their professional paths and respective approaches to supporting teaching and learning. It also explores the use of information and communication technology within what is seen as a changing university context. These two ‘new’ professional groupings are most associated with a shift of focus in universities from teaching towards learning, heightened emphasis on the quality of teaching and learning, the increased impact of learning technologies on practice, organisational transformation, and increased numbers of students attending universities, i.e. massification of higher education world-wide. Thus, equivalent exemplars and variations can also be found throughout Europe and in other international settings. The social structure and practices that govern the two groupings have been analysed by means of a wide range of theories, concepts and methods which include Bourdieu’s (1988) concepts of habitus, field, position and capital, Boyer’s (1990) ideas about new scholarship, Palmer’s (1998) conceptualisation of the university teacher and Clark’s (2003) identification of the entrepreneurial university. The work of others, in particular Schön (1967) and Ball (2003), also provides an insight into the powerful relationship between technology, society, education and change.

Read Full Text

What is the TPACK Framework?

Cox, S., & Graham, C. (2009). An elaborated model of the TPACK framework. Proceedings of Society for Information Technology Teacher Education International Conference 2009 (pp. 4042-4049). AACE

The introduction of the TPACK Framework has facilitated new and more rigorous study of teachers knowledge and use of technology in the classroom. However, the community interested in TPACK is still striving to develop a common understanding of what each construct in the framework means. A review of the research surrounding TPACK shows that there are still widely differing perceptions regarding how to operationalize the TPACK constructs and define boundaries between them. This paper reports on a conceptual analysis that was done to clarify construct definitions and boundaries in the TPACK framework. The research review and interviews with leading researchers have helped the authors to create an elaborated TPACK framework with case examples that further articulates the TPACK constructs and boundaries between them. The authors also suggest directions for future TPACK research.

Read Full Text

How can HOT blogging promote Higher Order Thinking?

Zawilinski, L. (2009). HOT Blogging: A Framework for Blogging to Promote Higher Order Thinking. The Reading Teacher62(8), 650-661. International Reading Association.

The article focuses on the use of educational blogs by elementary school teachers and students to encourage computer learning and literacy. The most commonly used blogs (also known as weblogs) in the classroom are: News blogs which report information about classroom schedules and homework; Mirror blogs in which the writers reflect on new ideas; Literature response blogs where teachers and students consider reading assignments; and Showcase blogs which post student work such as podcasts and art work. The article also discusses classroom and Internet resources available to help implement such technologies into a lesson plan.

Read Full Text

How can teachers be supported to use individualized instructional technology?

Proscia, M., Ulrich, F., Morote, E.S. & Nicolino, P. (2010). The relationship among level of knowledge, and comfort with both differentiated instruction and instructional technology and teachers’ attitude toward the use of computers. In Z. Abas et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2010 (pp. 925-932). AACE.

One hundred twenty-three (123) teachers were surveyed in 35 Long Island schools and 7 school districts that were selected for the quality of instructional software available in the districts. We found that knowledge and comfort of using technology are the major predictors of teacher willingness to use individualized instructional technology. Findings suggest that major training of teachers in instructional technology will be necessary to reach NCLB requirements for differentiated instruction.

Read Full Text

Tag Cloud