Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Posts tagged ‘blog and writing’

How can Google Blogs (Blogger) Promote Interactive Learning Communities in K-6 Language Arts Classes?

Beatty, Mia. “Integrating Google Blogs into the K-6 Language Arts Classroom To Promote Interactive Learning Communities.” (2013).

Bringing literacies into a classroom is not an easy task for a teacher, especially when two-thirds of teachers feel underprepared to use technology in the classroom (Barone & Wright, 2008). This online instructional module was designed to introduce K-6 educators to using Google Blogs (Blogger) in the classroom to promote interactive learning communities. Google Blogs was selected because of its enormous user base, ease of use, free access, and privacy features. Graduate students and educators voluntarily participated in this web-based module by taking pre- and post-assessments, and attitudinal surveys. The module engaged participants using short quizzes, videos, and images. The results indicate that after the module, participants felt more comfortable integrating an online tool such as Google Blogs into their classroom to promote interactive learning communities.

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How do blogs help EFL students become academic writers through collaborative dialogues?

Yu-Chih Sun, Yu-jung Chang (2012) Blogging To Learn: Becoming EFL Academic Writers Through Collaborative DialoguesLanguage Learning & Technology, February 2012, Volume 16, Number 1

This study examines how blogs and their interactive and collaborative features help academically-advanced graduate students process academic writing knowledge and make sense of their writer identity. Seven graduate students undertaking Master’s level study in TESOL and Linguistics participated. The research questions are: (a) What kinds of writing-related topics do students blog about? (b) How do students’ collaborative dialogues on blogs help them process and reconstruct knowledge about academic writing? (c) How do students’ collaborative dialogues on blogs facilitate their negotiation of academic identities and construction of authorship? Open-coding and content analysis were conducted to inductively identify salient themes and patterns regarding students’ learning and perception of their writer identities. The results suggest that the blog activity not only encourages students to actively and reflectively engage in knowledge sharing, knowledge generation, and the development of numerous strategies to cope with difficulties encountered in the learning process. Blogs also endow students with a sense of authorship as the writers of blog entries and, at the same time, provide a space for them to sort out what being an author entails, their purposes of writing, and their authority in writing.

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How can blogs support L2 language development?

Gebhard, M., Shin, D., Seger, W., (2011). Blogging and emergent L2 literacy development in an urban elementary school: A functional perspective. CALICO Journal28(2).

This study analyzes how a teacher in the United States used systemic functional linguistics to design a blog-mediated writing curriculum to support second grade English language learners (ELLs) literacy development and abilities to use computer-mediated communication tools for social and academic purposes in and out of school. The questions posed by this study relate to how blogging practices shaped a focus students emergent uses of print over nearly two years in a U. S. urban school serving a large Puerto Rican community. This study is informed by Hallidays theory of systemic functional linguistics (SFL) and Vygotskian conceptions of appropriation and mediation. Using a combination of ethnographic methods and the tools of genre analysis, the findings indicate that blog-mediated writing practices afforded students an expanded audience and range of purposes for literacy activities. These practices, coupled with genre-based instruction, supported the focal students emergent literacy development. The implications of this study relate to conceptualizing how ideational, interpersonal, and textual metafunctions of language intersect through computer-mediated communication to support L2 language development.

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