Using the power of research to inform ICT integration in education

Archive for the ‘Library’ Category

Is a second grade student’s silent reading comprehension affected by the use of electronic texts?

Stewart, Shannon M. (2012) Reading in a Technological World: Comparing the iPad to Print, Master of Education (MEd), Bowling Green State University, Reading, 2012

The key to improving reading education is to continually asses the most effective methods and strategies. Since the beginning of reading education, paper-based texts have been the focus of, and the tools used with, instruction. However, technological advances could possibly alter the world of reading instruction—and much more quickly than previously thought. In the past years, the electronic book has emerged and poses drastic changes to the paper-based text’s place in the school. In an ever-evolving technological world, more and more schools are choosing to adopt solely electronic texts. Instead of heavy textbooks and full classroom libraries students are now experiencing iPads and iBooks. Due to the fact many schools are moving toward an electronic curriculum, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these new literacies. Therefore, this study was developed to answer the following questions: Is a second grade student’s silent reading comprehension affected when using an electronic reader? Also, how do these students feel about the electronic reader and its use? Data was collected through a short experience survey and comprehension quizzes administered in a second grade classroom of 18 students. The results of this study demonstrated no significant statistical difference between the comprehension of students using the iPad and those reading from a printed text. However, surveys and observations demonstrated an increase in engagement when using the electronic reader in the classroom.

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How can Elementary School Children be better supported in their Web Searches at School?

Eickhoff, C., P. Dekker, and A. P. de Vries (2012) Supporting Children’s Web Search in School Environments, 4th Conference on Information Interaction in Context (IIiX)

Nowadays, the Internet represents a ubiquitous source of information and communication. Its central role in everyday life is reflected in the curricula of modern schools. Already in early grades, children are encouraged to search for information on-line. However, the way in which they interact with state-of-the-art search interfaces and how they explore and interpret the presented information, differs greatly from adult user behaviour. This work describes a qualitative user study in which the Web search behaviour of Dutch elementary school children was observed and classified into roles motivated by prior research in cognitive science. Building on the findings of this survey, we propose an automatic method of identifying struggling searchers in order to enable teaching personnel to provide appropriate and targeted guidance where needed.

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What makes new literacies new?

Colin Lankshear and Michele Knobel (2012) ‘New’ literacies: technologies and values, article extracted and edited from the book “New Literacies” Third Edition, by Colin Lankshear and Michele Knobel. McGrawHill, Open University Press, 2011, chapter 3, pp. 51-92.

It is too easy to make light of ‘new literacies’ by saying things like: “Well, there are always newer ones coming along”. Such remarks suggest new literacies have a similar kind of life trajectory to an automobile: new in 2009, semi-new in 2010, and old hat by 2011. Against this kind of “that’s so yesterday” perspective, we suggest in this article that ‘new literacies’ are best understood in terms of an historical period of social, cultural, institutional, economic, and intellectual change that is likely to span many decades – some of which are already behind us. We associate new literacies with an historical conjuncture and an ascending social paradigm. From this perspective we suggest that the kinds of practices we currently identify as new literacies will cease to be ‘new’ once the social ways characterizing the ascending paradigm have become sufficiently established and grounded to be regarded as conventional. Furthermore we suggest that at the heart of the idea of new ethos stuff is the idea of technological change aligning with a range of increasingly popular values.

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How can Google Sites benefit an Academic Library in India?

Nirmal Ranjan Mazumdar,  Sanjay Kumar Singh (2012) Google Sites for Academic Library: A Practical Approach in Pub Kamrup College Library, 8th Convention PLANNER-2012, Sikkim University, Gangtok, March 01-03, 2012

With the application of information and communication technology, the library and information centers are now become more available as well as usable for all. IT based library and information center gives the maximum opportunity to the user- community to search their required information using different IT tools. The Google Sites is a service of Google where a webpage can be designed. The steps of designing a website using the Google are discussed in this paper among with the example of Pub Kamrup College Library website.

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Should Librarians teach students how to Google?

Sorensen, Charlene; Dahl, Candice (2008) Google in the research and teaching of instruction librarians, Journal of Academic Librarianship v.34, no.6, 482-488

This exploratory study assesses the differences and similarities between how instruction librarians in Western Canada use Google and how they instruct students to use it. Survey results indicate that these librarians do use Google but can be influenced by faculty to present Google negatively to students.

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Why do we need new critical approaches to information technology in librarianship?

Gloria J. Leckie, John E. Buschman (2009) Information technology in librarianship : new critical approaches, Libraries Unlimited

In the last 15 years, the ground – both in terms of technological advance and in the sophistication of analyses of technology – has shifted. At the same time, librarianship as a field has adopted a more skeptical perspective; libraries are feeling market pressure to adopt and use new innovations; and their librarians boast a greater awareness of the socio-cultural, economic, and ethical considerations of information and communications technologies. Within such a context, a fresh and critical analysis of the foundations and applications of technology in librarianship is long overdue.

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How does the millennial generation search for information?

Taylor, A. (2012) “A study of the information search behaviour of the millennial generation” Information Research17(1) paper 508

Statistically significant findings suggest that millennial generation Web searchers proceed erratically through an information search process, make only a limited attempt to evaluate the quality or validity of information gathered, and may perform some level of ‘backfilling’ or adding sources to a research project before final submission of the work. These findings indicate that the search behaviour of millennial generation searchers may be problematic. Existing search models are appropriate; it is the execution of the model by the searcher within the context of the search environment that is at issue.

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How does information literacy relate to learning?

Mandy Lupton (2008) Information Literacy and Learning, PhD thesis, Queensland University of Technology.

This thesis explores the relationship between information literacy and learning. In formal education, students are frequently required to independently find and use information to learn about a topic, and information literacy is often claimed to be a generic skill and graduate attribute. However, to date; the experienced relationship between information literacy and learning has not been investigated. My primary research question was ‘What is the experienced relationship between information literacy and learning?’ The secondary research question was “What are the generic and situated aspects of information literacy?’

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How can Libraries adopt ‘Information in Context’ structures to facilitate organizational learning?

Somerville, M.M.& Howard,Z. (2010) Information in context: Co- designing workplace structures and systems for organizational learning. Information Research, 15(4).

This paper discusses an ‘information in context’ design project at Auraria Library in Denver, Colorado which aims to collaboratively create organizational structures and communication systems with and for library employees. This project resulted in several of the co-designed knowledge initiatives being implemented within Auraria Library to enhance communication, decision making and planning systems. These included both face to face and technology enabled initiatives such as such as ‘brown bag’ lunches to a new wiki based intranet system. This project advances professional practice through better understanding how to create workplace contexts that cultivate individual and collective learning through situated ‘information in context’ experiences. An appreciative framework was developed which values information sharing and enables knowledge creation through shared leadership.

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How does informed learning go beyond information literacy?

Bruce, Christine S., Hughes, Hilary E., & Somerville, Mary M. (2012) Supporting informed learners in the 21st century. Library Trends, 60(3), pp. 522-545.

The idea of informed learning represents and advances understandings of information literacy that incorporate the broader concept of using information to learn: those understandings that go beyond the functional or generic information literacy paradigm and draw attention to the transformational, situated and critical aspects of information literacy. Using information to learn is a natural, but often implicit part of all formal and informal learning environments, and is a vital component of the lifelong learning agendas of many nations worldwide. Supporting informed learning requires conscious attention to the use of information in the learning process, by educators, managers, trainers, and policy makers in all sectors. It requires a far reaching response to policy directions involving a wide range of stakeholders.

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A developmental approach to new media literacy?

Diana Graber (2012) New Media Literacy Education (NMLE): A Developmental Approach, Journal of Media Literacy Education 4:1 (2012) 82 – 92

Waldorf-inspired schools may have a successful formula for the development of ethical thinking and new media literacy skills. By providing rich sensory experiences and social interactions for students from the time they are very young, these schools are sowing the seeds of new media literacy without any technology in sight. The challenge they face now is taking the next step. In doing so, Waldorf-inspired could be the model for Ohler’s (2010) vision of a “whole school approach to behavior that sets the entirety of being digitally active within an overall ethical and behavioral context” (145). Maybe some of these practices will even find their way into traditional schools, giving more students a chance to experience a developmental approach to new media literacy that will equip them to be creative, capable, and ethical users of today’s technology, or technologies that are yet seeds in their imaginations.

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Are Instructional Design and Educational Technology Overlooked by Academic Library Administrators?

John D. Shank, Nancy H. Dewald (2012), Academic Library Administrators’ Perceptions of Four Instructional Skills, College & Research Libraries vol. 73 no. 1 78-93

The profession is in the midst of an unprecedented paradigm shift, moving from print-based to digital-based information. This dramatic change is impacting, and will continue to impact, the academic library. Clearly, it is vital to have highly skilled employees who are able to rapidly adapt to the changes as well as drive the innovations within the field. This study raises a very big question: who is responsible for driving that process? If, as the authors suppose, library administrators are key players in facilitating the hiring of new or redefined positions, then, based on the survey data, library administrators might be restraining change within the educational role of the library because of their biases.

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How can Libraries Support Students Live and Learn with Digital Media?

C. Shoemaker, H. Martin, B. Joseph (2010) How Using Social Media Forced a Library to Work on the Edge in Their
Efforts to Move Youth From “Hanging Out” to “Messing Around,  Journal of Media Literacy Education 2:2 (2010) 181 – 184

In 2009, Mimi Ito released Hanging Out, Messing Around and Geeking Out: Living and Learning with New Media, a book composed of 23 related studies. These ethnographic studies interrogated how learning is being experienced by teens via informal uses of digital media. The title refers to the framework around how youth learn through digital media and networked spaces, a kind of learning that is quite often invisible to adults who often confuse it with playing, wasting time or, at worst, as undermining youth’s ethical values and social competencies. This collection of studies, however, finds that these three different modes of participation with digital media, in fact, support the development of a wide range of new media literacies. This is the challenge offered by Ito and the one recently taken up by the New York Public Library. This worked example is not designed to report the successes or failure of this pilot project. Rather, it is intended to explore and take a critical look at the obstacles encountered along the way and discuss how they were negotiated. Finally, it will leverage Ito’s framework to provide context to understand what it means to use digital media for learning and how to apply these lessons learned, both for this organization and others.

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Quantitative vs. qualitative – do different research methods give consistent information about Library users and their space needs?

Susan E. Montgomery  (2011) Quantitative vs. qualitative – do different research methods give us consistent information about our users and their library space needs? Library and Information Research Volume 35 Number 111 2011

Assessment of how library patrons use space and the evaluation of their needs has become a “hot” topic in library research. But determining the best way to obtain information about their activity can be a challenge. Two types of data collection are quantitative and qualitative. Quantitative data provides a numerical count of what activities students perform within the library and therefore can be measured. Qualitative data gives personal opinions, feedback and individual perspectives regarding a topic but is not measurable. In this study, we were interested to learn if we would get substantially different results from a user observation study, a quantitative method, than from the results of asking users about their library space needs, a qualitative method. Essentially, would the results from both methods provide complementary results enabling us to obtain a comprehensive picture about our patrons’ needs and redesign the space to improve their library experience?

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Can a Virtual Reality Library help students develop information literacy skills?

Jamshid Beheshti (2012) Teens, Virtual Environments and Information Literacy, Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Volume 38, Issue 3

As digital natives, the vast majority of teens are used to cellphones, text messaging, social networking sites and other forms of electronic communications and technologies. Though rooted in the digital world for many of their daily activities, teens lack basic information literacy skills for academic tasks and other demands. Specific instruction through the educational system may not be feasible, but it may be possible to build teens’ information competence through interactive virtual learning environments. Game-style virtual environments are highly motivating and engaging, providing opportunities for repeated practice and reward for persistence and achieving goals. A virtual reality library, VRLibrary, was constructed, collaboratively designed by young teens and adults, based on the metaphor of a physical library. Teens could wander the virtual space and browse links to age-appropriate websites presented as virtual books. VRLibrary was very positively received and succeeded at engaging teen users. A librarian avatar could be incorporated to provide help as needed with a user’s information seeking.

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How can Library Media specialists be leaders in Professional Learning Communities?

Leslie E. Brantley (2011) The Leadership Role of the Library Media Specialist in a Professional Learning Community, a research paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Library Science and Information Services in the Department of Educational Leadership and Human Development University of Central Missouri

The Professional Learning Community (PLC) concept has been adopted by school districts as a model for professional development. A PLC requires strong leadership to function. The library media specialist is a natural servant-leader in school districts. The problem under study is what leadership role does the library media specialist play in a PLC? This is a review of the literature of PLC leadership and the role of the library media specialist in the PLC. The research demonstrates how the library media specialist fulfills a servant-leadership role in the daily structure of the school. The adoption of the PLC concept provides an opportunity to elevate the servant-leadership role of the library media specialist through collaboration, instructional leadership, and in the creation of a learning commons.

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How information literate are the Google generation entering university?

Fiona Salisbury, Sharon Karasmanis (2011) Are they ready? Exploring student information literacy skills in the transition from secondary to tertiary education, Australian Academic & Research Libraries

How information literate are the Google generation, and what information literacy skills do they bring to university? For university libraries, understanding student prior knowledge provides a foundation on which to introduce appropriate learning activities during the first year. In 2009, in response to a new pedagogical model in health sciences, La Trobe University Library measured and analysed the entry-level information literacy skills of first year health science students. The data was gathered during the first week of semester and 1,029 responses were collected. This paper examines the results of the survey and its implications for programs that broaden and build on students’ existing knowledge base.

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Are blogs the way to go for innovative web 2.0 Libraries?

Hanne Westh Nicolajsen, Ada Scupola, Flemming Sørensen (2010) Open Innovation Using Blog, Proceedings of IRIS33 Seminar (2010)

This article discusses the potential of involving users in service innovation through social software in the form of a blog. After a theoretical discussion of user involvement, and in particular about the pros and cons of user involvement using social software, the article reports from a field experiment at a university library. In the experiment a blog was established in an attempt to collect innovation ideas from the library users. The experiment documents, that a blog may provide for very different types of input resulting in insight into user’s perception of the library services, critics, wishes, concrete ideas etc. Additionally the experiment sheds light on the challenges using a blog to involve users in service innovation.

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How can Google Docs support an Information Literacy Assessment Program?

Ma Lei Hsieh, Patricia H. Dawson (2010) A University’s Information Literacy Assessment Program Using Google Docs, Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (10th, Maryville, Missouri, November 5, 2010)

The Rider University academic community has adopted information literacy (IL) as one of the core learning objectives for undergraduates. The IL objectives are based on the ACRL IL Competency Standards for Higher Education. The Moore Library developed an online survey to assess students’ skills on the first IL objective—identifying various resources. The survey was administered to students who attended information research instruction sessions in fall 2009. In spring 2010, a new survey was developed to assess students’ skills on the second IL objective—developing keyword strategies and accessing relevant information from the most appropriate resources. The surveys for the IL objectives collect rich data sets to inform the University community of the IL competency of students. The information is valuable for librarians and faculty in planning and incorporating IL into the curriculum of academic departments.

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What are possible pitfalls of the 2.0 movement for Libraries?

Tanja Merčun (2010) “Libraries in the Changing Online Environment “, In: A. Belan‐Simić & A. Horvat (Eds.), Slobodan pristup informacijama : 9. okrugli stol : zbornik radova. Zagreb : Hrvatsko knjižničarsko društvo (Izdanja Hrvatskoga knjižničarskog društva, 53), p. 69‐81.

In the last few years, libraries have been faced with a rapidly changing online environment that offered users a number of engaging and competitive services. This, together with the fact that more and more users are moving and interacting online, has forced libraries to start thinking about their role and presence in this virtual world. Although applying the Web 2.0 concepts has been repeatedly proposed as a solution for many of the libraries’ problems, it now seems that it may not be enough. We will look at the advantages and possible pitfalls of the 2.0 movement and ask ourselves of the future prospects it may offer in the context of virtual library environment. We will also discuss on what the 2.0 and future movements really mean for libraries and librarians and how the new concepts have been accepted and employed in Slovenia.

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Can the move to a Digital Library be Informed by the Technology Acceptance Model?

Jade Miller, Otto Khera (2010) “Digital Library Adoption and the Technology Acceptance Model: A cross-country analysis”, EJISDC (2010) 40, 6, 1-19

In this article, we examine, through the framework of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), some of the features that inform user acceptance of a digital library system implementation at agricultural universities in two developing countries: Kenya and Peru. This is a study not only examining factors contributing to adoption of this offline digital library, but also a cross-site comparison, meant to examine the functionality in the developing world of a theoretical model developed in and based on conditions in the developed world. As we unravel predictors of technological acceptance of a digital library implementation in the developing world, we simultaneously investigate a broader question: not just questions regarding improved research in the developing world, but on it as well.

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How is ICT Changing Libraries in Nigeria?

Speirs, M. (2010) “The Development of Information and Communication Technologies in Nigerian Libraries”, e-prints in library & information science

The development and use of information and communications technologies (ICT) in the libraries of Nigeria has been a slowly emerging process involving many successes and failures over the past decades. This chapter examines the history of this process while reviewing the challenges to this development that many libraries face because of inadequate infrastructure, and budgeted funding, as well as a lack of leadership and training for capacity building. Strategies for the way forward towards the effective and sustainable inclusion of technology in Nigerian libraries are suggested.

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How can library resources be embedded into learning management systems?

Emily Daly (2010) “Embedding library resources into learning management systems: A way to reach Duke undergrads at their points of need”, College Research Libraries News (2010), Volume: 71, Issue: 4, Pages: 208-212

The article describes the effort of the library management at Duke University to make the university’s library easily accessible to students. Four librarians started to work in 2007 to add Library Links to Blackboard course sites, which received positive feedback from both faculty and students. The Subject Portals Task Force was created to create a more user-friendly template for the Libraries’ subject guides. Then, they decided to automate the inclusion of Library Guides. The author reveals that majority of students find the automatically and manually linked Library Guides to be useful to their research.

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Can Blogs and other Web 2.0 tools Enhance Cataloging?

Sherab Chen, (2009) “Can Blogging Help Cataloging?: Using a Blog and Other Web 2.0 Tools to Enhance Cataloging Section Activities”, Library Resources Technical Services (2009) Volume: 53, Issue: 4, Pages: 251-260

In response to the ongoing conversation about Library 2.0, which has focused on user participation and emphasizes efficiency in delivering library services to users, this paper draws attention to a practical application in technical services: using Web 2.0 tools to enhance performance in the cataloging department. From his position as the coordinator for non-Roman cataloging in a large academic library, the author shares his experience using a blog and other Web 2.0 tools to improve section management and professional activities.

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How can we deal with Plagiarism in a Complex Information Society?

Debbie Wheeler, David Anderson, (2010) Dealing with plagiarism in a complex information society, Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, Vol. 3 Iss: 3, pp.166 – 177

Academic integrity is not something innate, it is something that needs to be learned. Efforts to deal with plagiarism must be systematic, equitable, process-oriented and pervasive at all institutional levels otherwise there is a risk that punitive measures may seem unpredictable, and so will not send a clear message to stakeholders. If this is the case, students are even less likely to appreciate the centrality of academic integrity in the educational context.

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How do librarians view innovation in academic libraries?

Ronald C. Jantz (2012) Innovation in academic libraries: An analysis of university librarians’ perspectives, Library & Information Science Research 34 (2012) 3–12

Through a series of structured interviews, university librarians at six institutions provided their perspectives on innovation in academic libraries. The literature on leadership styles and organizational change provides insight into the roles of these leaders in the innovation process. Leadership was cited by many researchers as being a critical factor for organizations to innovate. University librarians revealed a commitment to innovation, some distinctively nontraditional innovations, and a concern for how to encourage risk-taking behavior. Further insight into the innovation process was sought by interpreting the interview data within a larger theoretical context. Although leadership and management can foster innovation in a library, researchers have reported other factors that can influence the ability to innovate, including organizational aspects – size and complexity – and environmental factors. Beyond the organizational aspects, the individual and the norms of the profession appear to create a framework with certain boundaries, some of which may impact the ability to innovate.

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